British Colonial North American Timeline (1650 -1800)


  • 1650 – Roger Ludlow writes a Code of Laws for the Connecticut legislature to adopt.
  • 1650 – Mrs, H. Lake was accused of witchcraft, in Boston Massachusetts. She was executed, most likely by hanging. We have no additional information, about her life, death or burial.
  • 1651 – The first Navigation Act is made into law. It forbids the shipment of colonial goods in ships that are not English.
  • 1651 – The Dutch built Fort Casimir.
  • 1651 – Goody Bassett was accused of witchcraft, in Stratford, Connecticut. She was hanged. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial, of Goody Bassett.
  • 1651 – John Bradstreet was accused of witchcraft, in Rowley, Massachusetts. He was fined twenty shillings and received a whipping.We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial, of John Bradstreet.
  • 1651 – Elizabeth Godman was accused of witchcraft, in the Town of New Haven, New Haven County,in the State of Connecticut. She was freed while she was still under suspicion. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Elizabeth Godman.
  • 1651 – Mrs. Kendal was convicted of witchcraft, in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She was Executed, for the crime. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial, of Mrs. Kendal.
  • 1651 – Joan Carrington was convicted of witchcraft, at Hartford, Connecticut, in March of 1651. She was hanged for the crime. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial, of Joan Carrington.
  • 1651 – John Carrington was convicted of witchcraft, at Hartford, Connecticut, in March of 1651. He was hanged for the crime. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial, of John Carrington.
  • 1651 – Hugh Parsons was accused of witchcraft, in Springfield, Massachusetts, on the Thirty-first day of May, in 1651. He had had a similar problem, back in 1645. This time Hugh Parsons was acquitted, of the charges. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial or Hugh Parsons.
  • 1651 – On the Twenty-ninth day of May, in 1651, in Springfield, Massachusetts, Mary Parsons was convicted of witchcraft. Some people said she was executed. Her family said she was acquitted, in 1674 and lived until 1712. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Mary Parsons.

  • 1652 – April and May – The Names of the Members of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Bishop, John Bishop represented The Charles City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Borrowes or Burroughes, Charles represented The Lower Norfolk County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly of the House of Burgesses.
    • Due or Dew Thomas Dew represented The Nansemond City Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses. The Nansemond City Area is now part of the Suffolk City and Area.
    • Fletcher, George Fletcher represented The Northumberland County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Fludd or Flood, John Fludd represented The James City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • George, John George represented The Isle of Wight County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Gwinne or Gwynn, Hugh Gwinne represented The Gloucester County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Hardie or Hardy, George represented The Isle of Wight County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Hatcher, William Hatcher represented The Henrico County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Hill, Edward Hill represented The Charles City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Hoskins, Anthony Hoskins represented The Northampton County Area and a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Johnson, Thomas Johnson represented The Northampton County Area and a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Jones, William Jones represented The Northampton County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Lambert, Thomas Lambert represented The Lower Norfolk County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Lee, Henry Lee represented The York County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Lloyd or Loyd, Cornelius represented The Lower Norfolk County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Mansill, David or Daniel Mansill represented The James City County Area and was a member of the State of the Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Major, Edward Major represented The Nansemond City Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses. Edward Major was the Speaker of the House of Burgesses, for the April and May, 1652 Session.
    • Matthews or Mathews, Samuel Matthews represented The Warwick County or River Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Moone, John Moone represented The Isle of Wight County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Morgan, Francis Morgan represented The York County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Mottram, John Mottram represented The Northumberland County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Pitt, Robert Pitt represented The Isle of Wight County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Ransom, Peter Ransom represented The Elizabeth City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Robbins, Obedience Robbins represented The Northampton County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Scarbrough, Edmond Scarbrough represented The Northampton County Area and was a member of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Shepard or Sheppard, John represented The Elizabeth City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Soane, Henry Soane represented The James City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Stephen, George Stephen represented The James City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Warner, Austin Warner represented The York County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Weatherall or Wetherall Robert Weatherall represented The James City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Whittbye or Whitby, William Whittbye represented The Warwick County or River Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Whittakere or Whittaker, William Whittaker represented The James City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Willis, Francis Willis represented The Gloucester County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the Houde of Burgesses.
    • Woodhouse, Henry Woodhouse represented The Lower Norfolk County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.

  • In November of 1652 The Names of of the Members of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Burrowes or Burroughes, Charles Burrowes represented The Lower Nolfolk County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Calthroppe or Calthropp, X’pher Calthropp represented The York County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Charlton, Stephen Charlton represented The Northampton County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Dew or Due, Thomas Dew represented The Nansemond City Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses. Thomas Dew was the Speaker of the House of Burgesses for the November of 1652 session.
    • Edwards, William Edwards represented The Surry County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Fleet, Henry Fleet represented The Lancaster County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Gill, Stephen Gill represented The York County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Gouge, William Gouge represented The York County Area and was a member of State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Gwinne or Gwynn, Hugh represented The Gloucester County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Harris, William Harris represented The Henrico County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Hone, Theodore Hone represented The Elizabeth City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Lambert, Thomas Lambert represented The Lower Norfolk County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Lloyd, Cornelius Lloyd represented The Lower Norfolk County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Llewellin, Daniel Llewellin represented The Charles City County Area ans was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Matthews or Mathews, Samuel Matthews represented The Isle of Wight County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Montague, Peter Montague represented The Nansemond City Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses. The Nansemond City became a part of the Suffolk City Area.
    • Perry, Henry Perry represented The Charles City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Ransome or Ransom, Peter Ransome represented The Elizabeth City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Reynolds, Charles Reynolds represented The Isle of Wight County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Robbins, Colonel Robbins represented The Northampton County Area and a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Soane, Henry Soane represented The James City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Sparrow, Charles Sparrow represented The Charles City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Stephens, George Stephens represented The Surry County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Thomas, William Thomas represented The Surry County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Underwood, William Underwood represented The Lancaster County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Watson, Abraham Watson represented The James City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Weatherall or Wetherall Robert Weatherall represented The James City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Whittaker or Whittakere, William Whittaker represented The James City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Whittley or Whitly, William Whittley represented The Isle of Wight County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Willis, Francis Willis represented The Gloucester County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Woode or Wood, Abraham Woode represented The Charles City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Woodliffe or Woodcliffe Captain Woodcliffe represented The Charles City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.

  • 1652 – That year, the settlers of Rhode Island had ended the witch trials, slavery, capital punishment among other laws, that they consider unjust. They also, had let the neighboring colonies know of their disapproval of these laws.
  • 1652 – May 10, John Johnson, a free black man, is granted 550 acres in Northampton, Virginia.
  • 1653 – John Godfrey was accused of witchcraft, in Andover, Massachusetts. The final trial was not held until 1659. The outcome is unclear. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of John Godfrey.
  • 1653 – Goody Knapp, who lived in the Town of Fairfield, Fairfield County, in the State of Connecticut. She was accused of the the practice of witchcraft. Goody Knapp was convicted and hanged for the crime. We have no additional information, about the life, death, or burial of Goody Knapp.
  • 1653 – Mary Staples was from the Town of Fairfield, Fairfield County, in the State of Connecticut. Acquitted and her accuser, Roger Ludlow was  fined 20 pounds defamation.

  • 1653 – The Names of the Members of the State of the Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Bishopp or Bishop, John Bishop represented The Charles City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, Of the House of Burgesses.
    • Boothe or Booth, Robert Booth represented The York County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Boucher, Daniel Boucher represented The Isle of Wight County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Broadhurst, Walter Broadhurst represented The Northumberland County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Butler, William Butler represented The Surry County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Calthropp or Calthrop, X’pher Calthropp represented The York County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Chiles, Walter Chiles represented The James City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Dew or Due, Thomas Dew represented The Nansemond City Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Edwards, William Edwards represented The Surry County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Fauntleroy, Moore Fauntleroy represented The Lancaster County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Fletcher, George Fletcher represented The Northumberland County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Fowden, George Fowden represented The Isle of Wight County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Hackett, Thomas Hackett represented The Lancaster County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Harris, William Harris represented The Henrico County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Hockaday, William Hockaday represented The York County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Horsey, Stephen Horsey represented The Northampton County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Iversonn, Abraham Iverson Represented The Gloucester County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Johnson, Thomas Johnson represented The Northampton County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Lloyd, Cornelius Lloyd represented The Lower Norfolk Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Morgan, Francis Morgan represented The York County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Major, Edward Major represented The Nansemond City Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses. The Nansemond City has been incorporated into the City of Suffolk, in the State of Virginia.
    • Mathews or Matthews, Samuel Matthews represented The Warwick County or River Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Mellin or Mellon, William Millen represented The Northampton County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Montague, Peter Montague represented The Nansemond City Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses. The City of Nansemond was incorporated into the City of Suffolk, in Virginia.
    • Pate, Richard Pate represented The Gloucester County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Pitt, Robert Pitt represented The Isle of Wight County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Sheppard or Shepard, John Sheppard represented The Elizabeth City County Area and was a member of the House of Burgesses.
    • Soane, Henry Soane represented The James City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Thornbury, Thomas Thornbury represented The Elizabeth City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Watson, Abraham Watson represented The James City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Whittaker or Whittakers, William Whittaker represented The James City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Whittbye or Whittby, William Whittbye represented The Warwick County or River Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses. William Whittbye was the Speaker of the House of Burgesses, during the 1653 Sessions.
    • Wyatt, Anthony Wyatt represented The Charles City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Yardley or Yardly, Francis Yardly represented The Lower Norfolk County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.

  • 1654 – November 21, Richard Johnson, a free black man, is granted 550 acres in Virginia.
  • 1654 – Kath Grady from  Jamestown, Virginia, was hanged at sea. We have no additional information, about the life, death, or burial of Kath Grady.
  • 1654 – On the sixteen day of October, Mrs. Richard Manship of the State of Maryland, was acquited and her accuser Peter Godson was Judged to have defamed and slandered Mrs. Richard Manship. We have no additional information, about the life, death, burial of Mrs. Richard Manship.
  • 1654 – On the Twenty-third day of June, in the State of Maryland, Mary Lee was hanged at sea. No verdict was found on John Bosworth, Master of the Charity, whose crew hanged her. We have no additional information, about the life, death, burial of Mary Lee.
  • 1654 – In September, Lydia Gilbert, from Windsor, Connecticut was hanged. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Lydia Gilbert.

  • The 1654 and 1655 Names of the Members of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses Sessions.
    • Abrell, Robert Abrell represented the New Kent County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Bagnall, James Bagnall represented The Lancaster County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Batt, William Batt represented The Surry County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Baynham or Bainham represented the Westmoreland County Area and was a member of the State of Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Bond, John Bond represented The Isle of Wight County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Booth or Boothe, Robert Booth represented the York County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Breman, Thomas Breman represented The Gloucester County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Carter, John Carter represented The Lancaster County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Cock or Cocke, Richard represented The Henrico County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Dew or Due, Thomas represented The Nansemond City Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses. The City of Nansemond was, later incorporated into the City of the Suffolk Area, in the State of Virginia.
    • Dipnall, Thomas Dipnall represented The James City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Hamlin, Stephen Hamlin represented The Charles City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Hayward, John Hayward represented the York County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Hill, Edward Hill represented The Charles City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Hobbs, Francis Hobbs represented The Isle of Wight County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Holland, John Holland represented the Westmoreland County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Hoskins, Bartholomew Hoskins represented The Lower Norfolk County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Godwin or Goodwin, Thomas Godwin represented The Nansemond City Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Gooch, William Gooch represented the York County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Johnson, Thomas Johnson represented The Northampton County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Abrell, Robert Abrell represented The New Kent City or County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Mason, James Mason represented The Surry County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Mason, Lemuell Mason represented The Lower Norfolk County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Matthewes or Matthews, Samuel represented The Warwick County or River Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Moone, John Moone represented The Isle of Wight County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Perry, Henry Perry represented The Charles City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Pitt, Robert Pitt represented The Isle of Wight County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Shepard or Sheppard, John Sheppard represented The Elizabeth City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Soane, Henry Soane represented The James City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Stoughton, Samuel represented The Nansemond City Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses. The City of Nansemond was later, incorporated into the Suffolk City Area, of Virginia.
    • Trussell, John Trussell represented The Northumberland County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Walker, Peter Walker represented The Northampton County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Brugesses.
    • Waters, William Waters represented The Northampton County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Watson, Abraham Watson represented, The James City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Webb, Wingfield Webb represented The Gloucester County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Whitaker or Whittaker, William Whittaker represented The James City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Whitbye or Whittbye William Whitbye represented The Warwick County of River Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Wood, Abraham Wood represented The Charles City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Worlich or Woodridge, William Woodridge represented The Elizabeth City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • 1655 – September 15, the Peach tree War, the Native Americans destroy Pavonia, New Jersey again. The Swedes are forced to give up the forts in South Jersey to Dutch leader Peter Stuyvesant.                         ——————————————————————————————————————–
  • 1655 – In the Town New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut, Mrs. Bayley Nicholas, was freed, but banished, from the colony. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Mrs. Nicholas Bayley.
  • 1655 – In the Town New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut, Bayley Nicholas, was freed, but banished, from the colony. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Nicholas Bayley.
  • 1655 – In September, Elizabeth Godman of Town of New Haven, New Haven County, Connecticut. The trial vertict was Suspicion of witchcraft. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Elizabeth Godman.
  • 1655 – On the fourth day of October, in the Town of New Haven, New Haven County, in the State of Connecticut. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Elizabeth Godman.
  • 1656 – March 10, in the colony of Virginia, suffrage is extended to all free men regardless of their religion. We have no additional information, about the life, death of burial, of Eunice Cole from the Town of Hampton in the State of New Hampshire. Eunice Cole was accused of witchcraft, discharged and released. We have no additional information, about the life, death, burial of Eunice Cole.
  • 1656 – The Dutch capture the colony of New Sweden. We have no additional information, about the life, death, or burial of the Dutch.
  • 1656 – Jane Welford was from the Town of Dover, in New Hampshire. He was accused of witchcraft, then he was freedom condition of good behavior.

  • The 1655 and 1656 Names of the Members of the State of the Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Ashton or Aston Peter Aston represented the Elizabeth City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Bacon, Nathaniel Bacon represented the Isle of Wight County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Beazley, Jobadiah Beazley represented the Isle of Wight County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Blake, Captain Blake represented the Nansemond City Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses. The Nansemond City Area was incorporated into the Suffolk Area of Virginia.
    • Bond, John Bond represented the Isle of Wight County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Chicheley, Henry Chicheley represented the Lancaster County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Croshaw, Joseph Croshaw represented the York County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Davis, Thomas Davis represented the Warwick County of River Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Ellyson or Ellison, Robert Ellison represented the James City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Fauntleroy, Moore Fauntleroy represented the Lancaster County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Flood or Fludd, John Flood represented the James City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Foster, Richard Foster represented the Lower Norfolk County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Harris, William Harris represented the Henrico County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Holt, Robert Holt represented the James City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Hone or Hoane, Theophilus Hone represented the James City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Hoskins, Bartholomew Hoskins represented the Lower Norfolk County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the Houde of Burgesses.
    • Lambert, Thomas Lambert represented the Lower Norfolk County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Langley, Ralph Langley represented the York County area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Llewellen or Lluellin, Daniel Llewellen represented the Charles City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Lyggon or Ligon, Thomas Lyggon represented the Henrico County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Mason, Lemuel Mason represented the Lower Norfolk County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Page, John Page represented the York County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Ramsey, Thomas Ramsey represented the Gloucester County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, Of the Houese of Burgesses.
    • Reade or Reed George represented the York County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Scarborough, Edmond Scarborough represented the Northampton County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Sidney, John Sidney represented the Lower Norfolk County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Smith, Nicholas Smith represented the Isle of Wight County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Streeter, Edward Streeter represented the Nansemond City Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses. The City of Nansemond was later, incorporated into the Suffolk City Area, of Virginia.
    • Trussell, John Trussell represented the Northumberland County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Wade, Armiger Wade represented the York County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Whittaker or Whitaker, William Whitaker represented the James City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Wilcox, John Wilcox represented the Nansemond city Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses. The Nansemond City was incorporated into the Suffolk Area of Virginia.
    • Willis, Francis Willis represented the York County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Wood, Abraham Wood represented the Charles City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Wyatt, Anthony Wyatt represented the Charles City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.

1656 – March 10, in the colony of Virginia, suffrage is extended to all free men regardless of their                          religion. We have no additional information, about the life, death of burial, of Eunice Cole from the Town                of Hampton in the State of New Hampshire. Eunice Cole was accused of witchcraft, discharged and                        released. We have no additional information, about the life, death, burial of Eunice Cole

1656 – The Dutch capture the colony of New Sweden. We have no additional information, about the life, death, or burial of the Dutch.

1656 – Jane Welford was from the Town of Dover, in New Hampshire. He was accused of witchcraft, then he was freed on condition of good behavior. We have no additional information, about the life, death, burial, of Jane Welford.

1656 – William Harding came from the Northumberland area of Virginia, when he was accused of witchcraft. On the November, he was ten stripes, from a lash and permantent banishment from the colony. William Harding’s accuser was the Reverend David Lindsay. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of William Harding.

1656 – On the Nineteenth day of June, Anne Hibbins was hanged, after she was accused and convicted of witchcraft, while living in Salem Masssachusetts. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Anne Hibbins.

1657 – Goodwife Batchelor was trialed convicted and condemned to hang, in Massachusetts. The final result is unknown. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Goodwife Batchelor.

1657 – Hogg with unknown given name, living in Massachusetts, was condemned to hang. The final result is unknown. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Mr. Hogg.

1657 – Jane Hogg, living in Massachusetts, was condemned to hang. The final result is unknown. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Jane Hogg.

1657 – William Meaker was living in the Town of New Haven, New Haven County, in the State of Connecticut, when he was Acquitted for the crime of witchcraft. He may be the same William Meeker who married Sarah Preston, in 1649, and later relocated to Newark, New Jersey. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of William Meaker.

1657 – Anne Pope came from Massachusetts. She was accused, tried and convicted of witchcraft. The final result is unknown. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial, of Anne Pope.

1657 – Barbara Wingborough, of Virginia was acquitted of the crime of witchcraft, on the Twelfth day of September. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial or Barbara Wingborough.

1657 – The first iron works was started in an area between New London and Branford, Connecticut.


  • In 1657 and 1658 the Names of the Members of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Blacky or Blackie, William Blacky represented the New Kent Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Bond, John Bond represented the Isle of Wight County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Borne or Born, Robert Borne represented the York County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Brewer, John Brewer represented the Isle of Wight County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Bridger, Joseph Bridger represented the Isle of Wight County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Burtler, William Butler represented the Surry County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Carter, Edward Carter represented the Upper Norfolk Area and was a member of the state of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Carter, John Carter represented the Lancaster County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Corker, William Corker represented the James City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Cowfield or Cawfield, William Cawfield represented the Surry County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Davis, Thomas Davis represented the Warwick County or River Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Edwards, William Edwards represented the Surry County Area and was a member of the State of the Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Elliott or Elliot, Anthony Elliott represented the Gloucester County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Francis, Thomas Francis represented the Upper Norfolk County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Goodwin or Godwin, James Goodwin represented the York County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Ham, Jeremy Ham represented the York County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Haney, John Haney represented the Northumberland County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Harris, William Harris represented the Henrico County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Hay or Haye, William Hay represented the York County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Horsmenden, Warm Horsmenden represented the Charles City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Kendall, William Kendall represented the Northampton County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Knight, Peter Knight represented the Northumberland County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Loveinge or Loving, Thomas Loveinge represented the James City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Mellings or Mellen, William Mellen represented the Northampton County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Michell or Mitchell, William Mitchell represented the Northampton County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Montague, Peter Montague represented the Lancaster County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Powell, John Powell represented the Elizabeth City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Revell, Randall Revell represented the Northampton County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Ramsey or Ramsay, Thomas Ramsey represented the Gloucester County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the Houseof Burgesses.
    • Lucas, Thomas Lucas represented the Rappahannock County Area and was a member of the State of the Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Mason, Lemuell Mason represented the Lower Norfolk County Area and was a member of the State of the Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Smith, John Smith represented the Warwick County or River Area and was a member of the State of the Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses. John Smith was the Speaker of the House of Burgesses, for the 1657 ans 1658 Sessions, of the State of Virginia Assembly.
    • Soane or Sone, Henry Soarn represented the James City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Swann or Swan, Thomas Swann represented the Surry County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Tabenor, Thomas Tabenor represented the Isle of Wight County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Webb, Giles Webb represented the Upper Norfolk County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Webster, Richard Webster represented the James City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Willcox or Wilcox John Wilcox represented the Northampton County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Wooldridge, William Wooldridge represented the Eilzabeth City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Wynne or Winne, Robert Wynne represented the Charles city County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.

1658 – Elizabeth Richardson from Maryland, was hanged at sea. No Verdict was found on the complaint brought by John Washington against Edward Prescott, the Master of the Sarah Artch, whose crew hanged her. We have no additional information, about the life, death, or burial of Elizabeth Richardson or Edward Prescott.

1658 – Elizabeth “Goody” Garlick, of East Hampton, Connecticut on the fifth day of May for trial and was accused of witchcraft. She was brought before the Magistrates of East Hampton and brought. Elizabeth “Goody” Garlick was released, but she and her husband Joshua Garlick of East Hampton had to pay court costs. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial, of Elizabeth “Goody” Garlick.

1658 – Katherine Grade of Jamestown, was hanged at sea. Captain Bennet was called for by a Jury, but no verdict was found. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Katherine Grade.

1658 – Margaret Jennings of Saybrook, Connecticut, was released on the Fifth day of September, when they had a hung jury. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Margaret Jennings.

1658 – Nicholas Jennings of Saybrook, Connecticut was released on the Fifth day of September, when they had a hung jury. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Nicholas Jennings.

1659 – Mistress Robinson of Virginia, was not tried. Her accuser, Anne Godby was fined three hundred pounds, in Tobacco and Caske, in December, of 1659. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Mistress Robinson. 


  • The 1659 and 1660 Names of the Members of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses Sessions.
    • Ashton or Aston Peter Ashton represented the Northumberland County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Abrahall, Robert Abrahall represented the New Kent County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Bacon, Nathaniel Bacon represented the York County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Baldry, Robert Baldry represented the York County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Bland, Theodorick Bland represented the Charles City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Bland, Theodorick Bland represented the Henrico County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Bond, John Bond represented the Isle of Wight County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Browne or Brown, William Browne represented the Surry County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Calthropp or Colthropp, Christopher Calthropp represented the York County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Cant, David Cant represented the Gloucester County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Carter, John Carter represented the Lancaster County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Cary, Miles Cary represented the Warwick County of River Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Catchmie, George Catchmie represented the Upper Norfolk County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Cawfield or Cowfield, William Cawfield represented the Surry County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Corbin, Henry Corbin represented the Lancaster County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Crowshaw, Joseph Crawshaw represented the York County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Curtis, John Curtis represented the Lancaster County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Denson, William Denson represented the Upper Norfolk County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Ellison, Robert Ellison represented the James County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Fauntleroy, Moore Fauntleroy represented the Rappahannock County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Farrar, William Farrar represented the Henrico County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Ford, Richard Ford represented the James City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Foulke or Fowke, Thomas Fowke represented the Westmoreland County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Griffith, Edward Griffith represented the Warwick County or River Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Hammond, Manwaring Hammond represented the New Kent County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Hill, Richard Hill represented the Isle of Wight County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Jennings, Peter Jennings represented the Gloucester County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Knight, Peter Knight represented the Gloucester County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Mason, Lemuel Mason represented the Lower Norfolk County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Morley, William Morley represented the James City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Pitt, Robert Pitt represented the Isle of Wight County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Powell, John Powell represented the Elizabeth City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Scarbrough or Scarborough, Edmund Scarborough represented the Northampton County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Sidney, John Sidney represented the Lower Norfolk County Area and was a member of the State of the Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Smith, Nicholas Smith represented the Isle of Wight County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Soane, Henry Soane represented the James City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Sparrow, Charles Sparrow represented the Charles City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Stringer, John Stringer represented the Northampton County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Waters, William Waters represented the Northampton County Area and was a member of the State of the Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Webb, Giles Webb represented the Upper Norfolk County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Weyre, John Weyre represented the Rappahannock County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Willis, Francis Willis represented the Gloucester County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Wooldridge or Worlrich, William Wooldridge represented the Elizabeth City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.
    • Wynne or Winne Robert Wynne represented the Charles City County Area and was a member of the State of Virginia Assembly, of the House of Burgesses.

  • 1660 – The Stuarts were restored to the English throne with King Charles II.
  • 1660 – Winifred Holman, of Cambridge Massachusetts, was accused of witchcraft. The verdict was unknown. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Winifred Holman.
  • 1660 – Mrs. W. Holmes of Plymouth, Massachusetts. She was acquitted, of witchcraft. Mrs. W. Holmes’ accuser had to make a public statement. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Mrs. W. Holmes.
  • 1660 – Mary Wright, of Long Island, New York, was acquitted of witchcraft. She had been accused of witchcraft, in Oyster Bay and sent to Massachusetts for trial. He was convicted of being Quaker and banished. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial, of Mary Wright.
  • 1660 – Once King Charles II is on the throne, the men charged with his father’s death (regicide) were condemned to death. Some of them were able to escape and went to New Haven, Connecticut. They were John Dixwell, William Goffe and Edward Whalley.
  • 1660 – The Dutch establish the Bergen Township, now the Bergen Square in Jersey City, New Jersey.
  • 1660 – A statue is passed limiting the sale of slaves in the colony of Virginia.
  • 1660 – England institutes the Navigation Act, which restricts colonial trade to English ships, and limits colonial exports of goods to England alone.
  • 1660 – As King Charles II takes the throne, Rhode Island needs a new charter. Colonists go to England.
  • 1661 – Joan Mitchell of Charles County, Maryland, technically not a witch trial, but rather an accused witch bringing suit against the four people for slandering her. However, it appears that Joan Mitchell had long been accused. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial or Joan Mitchell.
  • 1661 – The first school is established in Bergen Township, now Jersey City, New Jersey.
  • 1662 – John Winthrop, Jr. is able to get a charter for Connecticut.
  • 1662 – On September 12, Governor William Berkeley of Virginia was turned down in his attempts to repeal the Navigation Acts.
  • 1662 – Goodwife Ayres, of Hartford, Connecticut, a deathbed accusation of witchcraft by the eight year old daughter of John Kelley, of “disturbing” both her and the older Anna Cole. Found guilty by the Water Test. She escaped prison and fled the colony. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Goodwife Ayres.
  • 1662 – William Ayres, of Hartford, Connecticut, accused by the daughter of John Kelly of “disturbing” Anne Cole. Found guilty by Water Test of witchcraft, he escaped prison and fled the colony. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of William Ayres.
  • 1662 – Mary Barnes of Farmington, Connecticut was accused of witchcraft, by Rebecca Greensmith’s confession, with Elizabeth Seager and tried on the Sixth day of January. She was hanged in January, of 1663, in Bristol, Connecticut. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Mary Barnes.
  • 1662 – Mrs. Peter Grant, of Hartford Connecticut. She was accused of witchcraft, tried and convicted. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Mrs. Peter Grant.
  • 1662 – Rebecca Greensmith, of Hartford Connecticut, was hanged, Accused by William Ayres and the victim of “disturbing” Anna Cole. She confessed and implicated her husband and several others. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Rebecca Greensmith.
  • 1662 – Katherine Palmer of Hartford, Connecticut, was accused of witchcraft, in 1662. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Katherine Palmer.
  • 1662 – Mary Sanford of Hartford, Connecticut, was hanged, after being accused and convicted of witchcraft. Her accuser was William Ayres and and the victim of “disturbing” Anna Cole. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Mary Sanford.
  • 1662 – Elizabeth Seager of Hartford, Connecticut, was the wife of Richard Seager. Elizabeth Seager was tried three times. She was acquitted twice. Elizabeth Seager was found guilty the last time, but was discharged “under suspicion”. Accused of “disturbing” Anna Cole. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Elizabeth Seager.
  • 1662 – Judith Varleth of Hartford, Connecticut, was found guilty, one  / sixth. She was released after her brother in law, Peter Stuvesant, intervened. She was accused of “disturbing” the daughter of John Kelley. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Judith Varleth.
  • 1662 – James Wakely of Hartford, Connecticut, were the verdict was unknown, but since he quickly escaped to Rhode Island, it was probably guilty. He was accused of “disturbing” the daughter of John Kelley. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of James Wakely.
  • 1662 – Nathaniel Greensmith of Hartford, Connecticut, was found guilty on the Twentieth day of January. He was hanged on the Twenty-fourth day of February, in 1662. Accused by his wife Rebecca and either by the deathbed statement of the daughter of John Kelley of “disturbing” Anna Cole. (Fairly well to do) He had been accused in 1650 of stealing by William Eares (Ayres). We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Nathaniel Greensmith.
  • 1662 – Andrew Sanford, of Hartford Connecticut, was acquitted. He had benn accused of “disturbing” Anna Cole or the daughter of John Kelley. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Andrew Sanford.
  • 1663 – Rhode Island obtained a new charter and elected new governor and legislature. Benedict Arnold (ancestor of the traitor during the American Revolution) became Governor of Rhode Island.
  • 1663 – Religious group persecuted in other colonies move to Rhode Island.
  • 1663 – King Charles II allows the founding of a new colony, Carolina. The territory was given to eight Englishmen, who favor the crown. Anthony Ashley Cooper institutes a feudal like society there.
  • 1663 – April 6, King Charles II signs then charter for Carolina.
  • 1663 – The Navigation Act of 1663 insists that imports going to the American colonies, go through England, on English ships.
  • 1664 – The English establish a blockade of New Netherland forcing the Dutch and Governor Peter Stuyvesant to relinquish the colony to the British.
  • 1664 – On June 24, the Dutch surrender New Netherland to England. The area is taken without a shot. The land is named for the Duke of York and is between the Hudson River and the Delaware River.
  • 1664 – New Netherlands is given to King Charles II, brother James, the Duke of York who traveled to New Netherland with a fleet of ships to take the colony.
  • 1664 – New Jersey is founded by Sir George Carteret and John, Lord Berkeley.
  • 1664 – Philip Carteret is named the first governor of New Jersey.
  • 1664 – A pack is made that anyone buying an African may receive 60 acres, in New Jersey.
  • 1664 – Maryland passes a law making black slavery permanent, to avert blacks from using an English law which gives freedom to those people, who become Christian.
  • 1665 – Mary Hall, or Mrs. Ralph Hall, of Brookhaven, New York, was acquitted of witchcraft. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Mary Hall or Mrs. Ralph Hall.
  • 1665 – Ralph Hall, of Brookhaven, New York, was acquitted of witchcraft. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial, of Ralph Hall.
  • 1665 – Elizabeth Bennett, of the Town of St. Marys, St. Mary’s County, Maryland. She was charged by Philip Calvert. Then acquitted and “Cleared by Proclaimation”. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Elizabeth Bennett.
  • 1665 – Robert Treat founds the Town of Newark, New Jersey.
  • 1665 – The Colonies of New Haven, Saybrook and Connecticut officially become Connecticut, which include the towns of New Haven, Bradford, Guilford, Milford and Stamford. Matthew Griswold is instrumental in this effort.
  • 1667 – On September 23, Slaves in Virginia were banned from getting their freedom by converting to Christianity.
  • 1668 – The first Assembly meeting is held in Elizabethtown, New Jersey.
  • 1669 – Anne Hutchinson of Massachusetts, had a miscarriage, which was ascribed to her relationship with the Devil. She escaped to Rhode Island. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Anne Hutchinson.
  • 1669 – Mary Dyer, of Massachusetts, had a miscarriage,which was ascribed to her relationship to the Devil. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Mary Dyer.
  • 1670 – On October 13, Virginia passes a law that Africans arriving in the colonies as Christians could not be forced into slavery.
  • 1670 – Katherine Harrison of Wethersfield, Connecticut, was found guilty of witchcraft and banished from Connecticut. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Katherine Harrison.
  • 1671 – Mrs. Neal Christopher, of Northumberland County, in Virginia. She was not tried. Charges were brought against the accuser of a “Woman and her children”. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Mrs. Neal Christopher.
  • 1672 – The Royal Africa Company is given soul rights to the slave trade in the American colonies.
  • 1673 – The Dutch take back New York from the English.
  • 1673 – The British use the Navigation Act of 1673 to set up a customs office to collect fees on goods going from one plantation to another following the barter system.
  • 1673 – The Third New Jersey Regiment is formed at Piscataway. The unit is called the Jersey Blues.
  • 1673 – On September 21, James Needham returns to Virginia after exploring the lands west, which would become Tennessee.
  • 1674 – Father Jacques Marquette and Louis Joliet, explore parts of North America, including the Great Lakes and the Mississippi River, for the French.
  • 1674 – The Treaty of Westminster gives the colony of New York back to the British.
  • 1674 – Two Quakers, Edward Byllynge and John Fenwick buy West Jersey from Lord Berkeley.
  • 1674 – John Cowman of St. Mary’s County, in Maryland, was charged and convicted under the Statute of  James I for witchcraft, conguration, sorcery or enchantment upon the body of Elizabeth Goodale. He received a reprieve from execution from the Upper House of the Assembly. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of John Cowman.
  • 1675 – Jane or Joan Jenkins of the Town of Norfolk, Isle of Wight County, in the State of Virginia. She was accused of witchcraft, but not tried. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Jane or Joan Jenkins.
  • 1675 – John Fenwick founds a Quaker the settlement of Salem in West Jersey.
  • 1675 – King Philip’s War breaks out between colonists in Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode Island, and the Native Americans. This was because they both claimed the same land. King Philip’s Native American name is Metacomet, chief of the Wampanoags.
  • 1675 – On February 10, Narragansett and Nipmuck Native Americans raided Lancaster, Massachusetts. 35, or more settlers were killed. 24 were taken captive, including Mary Rowlandson and her3 children. Mrs. Rowlandson was freed after almost 3 months. An account of her experience was published after her death in 1682.
  • 1675 – The Great Swamp Fight near Kingston, Rhode Island was the first major victory of settlers over the Native Americans, in King Philip’s War.
  • 1676 – On May 10, Bacon’s Rebellion begins. The frontiersmen challenge the government of Virginia. They attack the capital in Jamestown, Virginia and Native American villiages.
  • 1676 – The Quintipartite Deed divides the New Jersey Colony into East Jersey and West Jersey, from Little Egg Harbor to the Delaware Water Gap. The meeting is between George Carteret, Edward Billinge, William Penn, Gawn Lawry and Nicholas Lucas.
  • 1676 – Metacomet, chief of the Wampanoag tribe, renamed King Philip by the colonists, was killed on August 12, 1676. Many people were killed on both sides of the war. Benjamin Church, a volunteer, ordered that King Philip be beheaded.
  • 1676 – On September 1, Nathaniel Bacon led an insurrection against Governor William Berkeley at Jamestown, Virginia; which was destroyed by fire. The rebellion was in response to the governor’s refusal to protect the colonists from Native American attacks.
  • 1676 – On October 18, Nathaniel Bacon is killed. He was born in 1647.
  • 1676 – New Hampshire and Maine suffer attacks from the Saco Native Americans.
  • 1677 – On April 27, Colonel Jeffries becomes Governor Sir Herbert Jeffries.
  • 1677 – May 29, England’s King Charles and 12 Native American chiefs sign a treaty securing a 3 mile zone of no trespassing around Native American land.
  • 1678 – Alice Cartwrite, of the Town of Norfolk, Isle of Wight County , in the State of Virginia. She was accused, then acquitted of witchcraft. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Alice Cartwrite.
  • 1679 – Paul Carter of Accomack County, Virginia, was accused of witchcraft, because the change in the condition of the corpse of his victim was sufficient to prove his guilt. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Paul Carter.
  • 1679 Caleb Gowell, of Newbury, Massachusetts, was a seaman accused of disturbing the Morse household. He served his apprenticeship with the “Wizard” Francis Norwood. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial or Caleb Gowell.
  • 1679 – After years of persistence, New Hampshire is able to obtain a new charter from King Charles II, and elect its own governor again.
  • 1679 – John Cutt became the governor of New Hampshire.
  • 1680 – New Hampshire becomes an independent colony, free of Massachusetts control.
  • 1680 – The first slaves in New Jersey are purchased for a plantation in Shrewsbury.
  • 1680 – On August 6, The Grant of 1680 is the Duke of York’s second grant. The participants are William Penn, Gawn Lawry, Nicholas Lucas, John Eldridge, Edmund Warner and Edward Billinge or Byllyinge.
  • 1680 – New Jersey founder, George Carteret dies.
  • 1681 – William Penn is given a land grant from King Charles II of England and founds the Quaker
  • State of Pennsylvania.
  • 1681 – William Markham served as Deputy Governor from 1681 to 1682, in the Colony of Pennsylvania.
  • 1682 – William Penn founds the Colony of Pennsylvania in 1682. He was born in London, on the Fourteenth day of October, in 1644. He was the son of Sir William Penn and Margaret Jasper. She was the daughter of a wealthy merchant. William Penn died in July of 1718.
  • 1682 – Rene-Robert Cavelier de La Salle or Robert de La Salle travels the Mississippi Valley, and claims the area for France, calling it Louisiana after King Louis XIV.
  • 1682 – New Jersey Governor Philip Carteret dies. His estate is sold to 24 different proprietors, who establish the Board of Proprietors.
  • 1682 – Nicholas Wise founds Norfolk, Virginia.
  • 1682 – Pennsylvania opens up for immigrants from Britain, the German regions of Europe; which includes: Quakers, Catholics, and other religions.
  • 1683 – Nicholas Desborough of Hartford Connecticut, was “Suspicioned” of witchcraft. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial or Nicholas Desborough.
  • 1684 – Thomas Lloyd served as President of Council, in Pennsylvania, from 1684 to 1688.
  • 1684 – Margaret Mattson of Pennsylvania, was one of Two “Old Swedish Women” and “Quakers”, who were acquitted of witchcraft by the order of Governor William Penn.
  • 1685 – The Duke of York inherits the thrown of England and becomes King James II.
  • 1685 – King Louis XIV of France, resends the Edict of Nantes, which gave the citizens freedom of religion. This decision persuades many to immigrate to the American colonies.
  • 1685 – New Hampshire new Governor John Cutt didn’t work out, neither did Governor Richard Waldron.
  • 1685 – Rebecca Fowler of St. Mary’s County, in the State of Maryland, on the Third day of October, she was executed, for the crime of witchcraft in Calvert County, in the State of Maryland. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Rebecca Fowler.
  • 1686 – Hannah Edwards, of St. Mary’s County, in the State of Maryland, was acquitted of the crime of witchcraft. She lived in Calvert County, in the State of Maryland. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Hannah Edwards.
  • 1686 – King James II begins to combine the colonies of New England into one, thus limiting their rights. The legislatures are replaced by royal supporters.
  • 1686 – England decided to combine all the New England states under one government. It became the Dominion of New England.
  • 1687 – The New England Royal Governor, Sir Edmund Andros, orders the Old South Meeting House, in Boston be closed and reopened as an Anglican Church, that March.
  • 1687 – King James II revokes the Connecticut charter, Sir Edmund Andros wanted to take the charter. Joseph Wadsworth ran off with it. Legend says he hid it in an old hollow oak tree on the property of Samuel Wylly.
  • 1687 – That August, Ipswich and Topsfield of Massachusetts object to assessments established by Governor Andros, complaining of taxation without representation.
  • 1688 – That March, Massachusetts Governor Andros states, that New England towns may only have one meeting per year.
  • 1688 – John Blackwell served as Deputy Governor, of Pennsylvania, in Philadelphia, in 1688.
  • 1688 – The Council of West Jersey Proprietors meets in Burlington, New Jersey.
  • 1688 – Massachusetts Governor Andros places all militias under his direction.
  • 1688 – In Pennsylvania, the Quaker Society makes a formal protest objecting to slavery.
  • 1688 – King James II of England leaves for France; once powerful forces within the government reject some of his views, especially on religion.
  • 1688 – Goody Grover of Salem Massachusetts, was executed. Probably the last person hanged for witchcraft in Boston, Massachusetts. This may be the Irish Catholic that Cotton Mather wrote about. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Goody Grover.
  • 1689 – That February, William and Mary of Orange take the throne of England. Mary is the daughter of James II.
  • 1689 – That April, the colonists of Boston put Governor Andros in jail.
  • 1689 – That July, Governor Andros sails for England to stand trial.
  • 1689 – The Dominion of New England did not work. New Hampshire is again put under the rule of Massachusetts.
  • 1689 – German immigrant, Jacob Leisler led an insurrection against the New York Colony, to 1691.
  • 1689 – Connecticut continues government with the charter.
  • 1690 – Thomas Lloyd served as Deputy Governor, in the State of Pennsylvania, in the Capital, Philadelphia.
  • 1690 – King William’s War begins. The French and Native Americans burn part of New York. England’s battles become America’s battles.
  • 1690 – John Worlidge surveys the Quintipartite Deed in New Jersey.
  • 1690 – That February, Schenectady, New York is burned by the French and Native Americans.
  • 1691 – William Markham served as Deputy Governor, of Pennsylvania, at the Capital, in Philadelphia,
  • 1691 – New Governor of New England, Henry Sloughter, arrives and establishes representative Government. Massachusetts gets a royal charter, which includes a governor’s council.
  • 1691 – Under England’s new leaders, New Hampshire gets a new government of its own. Again, that didn’t work out. New Hampshire remains under Massachusetts rule until 1741.
  • 1691 – August 16, lawyer, Thomas Ballard and Joseph Ring found Yorktown, Virginia.
  • 1691 – Plymouth officially becomes part of the Massachusetts Bay Colony.
  • 1692 – In Salem, Massachusetts, about 200 people accused of witchcraft are imprisoned, in the Salem Witch Trials. A special court is appointed. 20 people are executed. Later that year, the other people are released. The Court is excused.
  • 1692 – The Laurens Family is involved in the slave trade in South Carolina.
  • 1692 – Lieutenant Governor William Staughton was appointed Chief Justice of the Court of Oyer and Terminer,  in 1692, by Governor Sir William Phips. He ruled over the trials with the determination to eradicate all witched from the Massachusetts Bay Colony. He was heavily influenced by his conservative religious convictions. When the court was dissolved, William Stoughton continued to enjoy political success and never apologized for his role in the Salem Witch Trials.
  • 1692 – Waitstill Winthrop was appointed by Governor Sir William Phips, as one of the magistrates of the Court of Oyer and Terminer, that heard the Salem Witchcraft Trials. The same year, he was elected to the membership in the Military Company of Massachusetts and was also, elected as captain of the Company in June, of that year. He was the second son born to John and Elizabeth Reade Winthrop.
  • 1692 – Thomas Danforth was a magistrate and leading figure at the time of the Salem Witch Trials. He was born on the Nineteenth day of November, in 1623, in Framlingham, Suffolk, England. Thomas Danforth’s  parents were Nicholas Danforth, 1589 to 1638 and Elizabeth Symmes, 1596 to 1629. He did not sit on the Court of Oyer and Terminer, which means to hear and determine. Danforth was critical of and instrumental in bringing the Salem Witch Trials to an end.
  • 1692 – Samuel Sewall was a Chief Justice, who presided at the Salem Witchcraft Trials. He was the son of Stephen Sewall.
  • 1692 – Nathaniel Saltonstall was a judge for the court of Oyer and Terminer, in the Salem Witchcraft Trials. in Massachusetts. His was born to Richard Saltonstall and Murial Gurdon.
  • 1692 – Peter Sergeant was a judge in the Salem Witch Trials. He died on the Eighth day of October, in 1714.
  • 1692 – John Richards was known for his participation, in the Salem Witch Trials. He operated a mill and served on the General Court, the Massachusetts State Assembly.
  • 1692 – In early March, Johnathan Corwin was a magistrate in the Salem Witch Trials. John Hathorne and Corwin worked together on the trials. He was born to George and Elizabeth Herbert Corwin. Corwin was a merchant and shipbuilder.
  • 1692 – In the spring of 1692 Elizabeth Hubbard was seventeen. She and three other girls accused a number of people of witchcraft. Elizabeth and the girls had fits, trances and afflictions, in the Salem Witch Trials. They accused nineteen innocent people. She was an orphan living with her great aunt and uncle Dr. William Giggs.
  • 1692 – Mercy Lewis was born in Falmouth Maine, in 1675. She lost her parents in an Indian attack. She lived with Reverend George Burroughs, then with a distant relative, Thomas Putnam. Mercy Lewis and Anne Putnam were friends and two of the girls, who were accusers, in the Salem Witch Trials.
  • 1692 – Elizabeth Parris was the daughter of Samuel Parris, who was very involved in the witch trial accusations. Elizabeth, Ann Putnam and Abigail Williams were active in what was deemed as witchcraft. Abigail was taken to live in the home of Stephen Sewall, in Salem,and resolved her problems. The girls activities started some dreadful events that lead to the Salem Witch Trials..
  • 1692 – Anne Putnam, Jr. was another of the afflicted girls, in the Salem Witch Trials. Fourteen years later, she admitted that she had lied, because the devil influenced her. Anne Putnam, Jr. was born in 1679 and died in 1716. The family tree goes back to John Putnam and Priscilla Gould in 1580 of Buckinghamshire, England.
  • 1692 – Deodat Lawson was a minister in Salem Village from 1684 to 1688 and was famous for a 10 page pamphlet describing the witchcraft accusations in the early spring of 1692, in the Salem Witch Trials. It was printed that year in Boston, Massachusetts. The Pamphlet was promoted by Cotton Mather.
  • 1692 – In late April, of 1692, Philip English, the most successful merchant in Salem, emigrated from the Isle of Jersey in 1670. He was the largest ship owner in Salem and he married into a good family. He and his wife were arrested because of witchcraft. They fled to New York for the duration of the trials. No attempt was made to bring them back to the Salem Witch Trials. English’s estate was pillaged at the hands of Sheriff Corwin, and little restitution was made for his losses.
  • 1692 – On the Tenth day of May, Sarah Osborne died in prison. She was accused of witchcraft, by the Putnum Family, after a will and land dispute, in the Salem Witch Trials, in Massachusetts.
  • 1692 – On the Thirty-first day of May, Bartholomew was present, when his friend John Alden was examined in the Salem Witch Trials. Alden had fled the county, but was found innocent, in the Salem Witch Trials.
  • 1692 – On the Sixth day of June, Anne Dollover of Gloucester, and daughter of respected Salem minister the Reverend John Higginson. She was arrested for witchcraft, but she was never convicted. It would seem there are other issues, not known until later. People are still looking at this set of trials, with questions, in the Salem Witch Trials.
  • 1692 – On the Tenth day of June, Bridget Bishop was the first person to be executed for witchcraft, during the Salem Witch Trials. She was an outspoken innkeeper, who was tried and hanged, in the Salem Witch Trials.
  • 1692 – On the Nineteenth day of July, Sarah Good was hanged, after being accused of witchcraft, because she and her husband lived in poverty. Sarah Good’s six year old daughter, Dorcas was also, accused of witchcraft and imprisoned. Her other child, an infant, died in Prison, because of the Salem Witch Trials.
  • 1692 – On the Nineteenth day of July, Elizabeth Jackson Howe was found guilty executed, in the Salem Witch Trials. She had married James Howe. They had six children and lived in Topsfield, Massachusetts. Their children were James, Elizabeth, Mary, Deborah, John and Abigail.
  • 1692 – On the Nineteenth day of July, Rebecca Nurse was hanged after being found guilty, in the Salem Witch Trials. Governor Sir William Phips pardoned her, then changed his mind.
  • 1692 – On the Nineteenth day of July, Sarah Wildes was accused of witchcraft, hanged and later exonerated, in the Salem Witch Trials. She was born to William Averell and Abigail Hynton from Chipping Norton, England.
  • 1692 – On the Nineteenth day of August, Susannah Martin of Amesbury, was hanged as a witch, by some girls and neighbors of Salem, because of a dispute over her father’s will, in the Salem Witch Trials.
  • 1692 – On the Nineteenth day of August, George Burroughs was the only Puritan minister indicted and executed in Salem, Massachusetts, because of his unorthodox religious beliefs and practices. Reverend Cotton Mather urged on people against Burroughs, who was found guilty of being a virtual priest of the devil and hanged, in the Salem Witch Trials.
  • 1692 – On the Nineteenth day of August, John Willard was executed after refusing to arrest people that he believed to be innocent. One of his accusers was is wife’s grandfather, Bray Wilkins, who claimed, that Willard gave him a mean look.
  • 1692 – On the Nineteenth day of August, George Jacobs, Sr., was hanged as a wizard, for witchcraft. his granddaughter Margaret Jacobs, was his accuser. She was also, accused and Imprisoned.
  • 1692 – On the Nineteenth day of August, Martha Carrier was executed. She was called the Queen of Hell by Reverend Cotton Mather, during the Salem Witch Trials.
  • 1692 – On the Eighteenth day of September, Giles Corey was crushed to death, by placing heavy stones on him, in the Salem Witch Trials. This practice was illegal. He had been accused of witchcraft, by Anne Putnam, Jr., Marcy Lewis,Abigail Williams, Mary Walcott and Elizabeth Hubbard.
  • 1692 – On the Twenty-second day of September, Martha Corey was tried, convicted and put to death after being accused of witchcraft, by her Illegitimate son, in the Salem Witch Trials.
  • 1692 – On the Twenty-second day of September, Mary Towne Eastey was executed by hanging in Salem, Essex County, Massachusetts, in the Salem Witch Trials. She was the daughter of William and Joanna Towne, born in Great Yarmouth, Norfolk, in England. Two of her sisters were Rebecca Nurse and Sarah Cloyce. Mary Towne Estey was married to Issac Estey, who was a farmer and barrel maker. The Estey name can also, be spelled Esty, Easty, Estey, Eastick, Eastie and Estre.
  • 1692 – On the Twenty-second day of September, Alice Parker was executed, after being convicted of witchcraft. She was the wife of John Parker. Alice Parker was accused of bewitching People. The Reverend Nicholas Noyes officiated, at the hanging, during the Salem Witch Trials.
  • 1692 – On the Twenty-second day of September, the widow Anne Greenslit Pudeator was executed, in the Salem Witch Trials. She was accused witchcraft by a group or girls, and accused by John Best Sr., of killing his wife. Also, accused, because she was a midwife.
  • 1692 – On the Twenty-second day of September, Wilmot Redd was executed by hanging, During the Salem Witch Trials, probably because she was disagreeable. Her husband was a fisherman named Samuel Redd. Wilmot Redd was born in Marblehead, Massachusetts. The name Redd can also, be spelled Reed and Read. She was Jailed by Constable James Smith. The warrant was signed by Magistrates Jonathan Corwin and John Hathorne. Wimot Redd was said to have committed witchcraft of Mary Wilcott and Mercy Lewis, as well as others in Salem, Massachusetts.
  • 1692 – On the Twenty-second day of September, Margaret Scott was executed for witchcraft, during the Salem Witchcraft Trials.
  • 1692 – On the Twenty-second day of September. Samuel Wardwell was hanged, after being accused of witchcraft, in the Salem Witch Trials. He was born to a Quaker, in Boston. Samuel Wardwell moved to Andover, Massachusetts, where he married his second wife, Sarah Hawkes.
  • 1692 – In early October, of 1692, Thomas Brattle wrote a letter to an English clergyman, which was critical of the Salem Witch Trials. The letter was circulated widely, in Boston at the time, and it continues to be studied for its reasoned attack on the witchcraft trial in Salem. Brattle presented a compelling argument against the legal premises and procedures involved in the afflictions accusations and executions, with a particular focus on the validity of spectral evidence in the proceedings. He was careful not to argue against the motives of the “Salem Gentleman” as he calls the judges and ministers, at the helm, but rather against the methods they employed. He concludes by saying “I am afraid that ages will not wear off that reproach and those stains, which these things will leave behind them upon out (or our) land.
  • 1692 – Francis Dane was a elderly pastor, in Andover, Massachusetts. He had more of his family members accused than any other family, in 1692. It was Dane’s early October petitions to the General Court for pardons, writing against spectral evidence, filing of slander suits, and bold stance against the witchcraft trial that are credited with ending the proceedings in Andover so quickly. Dane is still regarded as the hero of Andover, because of his actions during the Salem Witch Trials, of 1692.
  • 1692 – Sarah Bibber was born in 1656. she was both the accuser and the accused. Sarah Bibber testified against Mary Bradbury, George Burroughs, Giles Corey, Mary Easty, Sarah Good, Dorcus Hoar, Elizabeth Howe, George Jacobs, Sr., Susannah Martin, Rebecca Nurse, Alice Parker, John Proctor, Anne Pudeator, Job Tookey, John Willard and Mary Witheridge. Sarah Bibber’s accusers were Joseph Fowler, Thomas Jacobs, Mary Jacobs, Sarah Nurse, John Porter, Lydia Porter and Richard Walker, in the Salem Witch Trials. The name for Bibber can also be spelled Biber, or Vibber. Sarah Bibber was married to John Bibber. They lived in Salem or Wenham.
  • 1692 – Susannah Sheldon was eighteen years old at the time of the Salem Witch Trials. She was one of the afflicted girls and accusers. Susannah Sheldon made her accusations in April of 1692. Her parents were William and Rebecca Scadlock, who were driven from their home in Saco Maine, by Native Americans during the KIng Philip’s War, in 1676. She was released from jail, in June of 1692.
  • 1692 – Sarah Churchill accused her abusive employer, George Jacobs of witchcraft. Her confession was to escape a death sentence, in the Salem Witch Trials. The plan succeeded.
  • 1692 – Elizabeth Booth accused ten people of witchcraft, in the Salem Witch Trials. Five of those people were executed for witchcraft. Later she married Israel Shaw. Elizabeth Booth was born to George Booth Sr., and Alice Temple. Their children were Israel Shaw and Susanna Shaw.
  • 1692 – Mary Warren, was a defender and a confessor. She was a servant of John and Elizabeth Procter. Mary Warren was one of the afflicted girls. These girls seemed to get caught up in the atmosphere of the Salem Witch Trials.
  • 1692 – Mary Walcott was closely related to the Putnam family. She was one of the accusing girls, in the Salem Witch Trials. These girls attracted much attention, and some seemed to enjoy that attention.
  • 1692 – Abigail Williams was one of the accusers of the Salem Witch Trials. She was the niece of the Reverend Samuel Parris. Abigail had fits and hysteria. Abigail Williams and her cousin Betty were two of the afflicted girls. She was involved in seventeen cases.
  • 1692 – Tituba was an Indian slave girl who was in the service of the Reverend Samuel Parrish. She was called a Detestable Witch. Tituba was in prison for thirteen months, during the Salem Witch Trials. An unknown person paid her jail fees and took her away from the Salem Village.
  • 1692 – Abigail Dane Faulkner was accused of witchcraft during the Salem Witch Trials. A number of her relatives were also, accused of witchcraft. All were arrested, and sentenced to death. Abigail Dane Faulkner’s execution was delayed due to pregnancy. Before she gave birth, she was pardoned by the governor, and released from Prison. Abigail Dane Faulkner born on the Thirteenth day of October, in 1652, in Andover, Massachusetts, and was the daughter of the Reverend Francis Dane and Elizabeth Ingalls.
  • 1692 – Margaret Jacobs is seen as a strong person, because after she had accused George Burroughs and George Jacobs, Sr., her grandfather, she retracted the accusations and sat in jail looking at death, and stood her ground, during the Salem Witch Trials.
  • 1692 – On the Third of December, Anne Foster died, in prison, after being questioned multiple times. Her family was reimbursed for her incarceration and burial. Earlier Elizabeth Ballard came down with a fever, during the Salem Witch Trials. The two “afflicted girls” were taken to Andover, Massachusetts. They pointed to Anne Foster, as the cause. Anne Foster was married to Andrew Foster. Their children were: Andrew, Abraham, Sarah or Mrs. Kemp, Hannah or Mrs. Stone and Mary or Mrs. Lacey.
  • 1692 – Increase Mather is credited with being a force of moderation, in the Salem Witch Trials. His son, Cotton Mather was famous and infamous. He was given the task of writing a history of the trials. His self contradicting positions on the use of spectral evidence swayed the proceeding and executions. Cotton Mather’s book The Wonders of the Invisable World appeared to try and justify the Salem Witch Trials.
  • 1692 – Samuel Parris is now believed to have been a very dangerous religious leader. He began preaching about the devil in people. Samuel Parris was able to split the Village of Salem into opposing factions, with his message of evil, during the Salem Witch Trials.
  • 1692 – Samuel Willard was instrumental in ending the Salem Witch Trials. He spoke out against the use of spectral evidence. Samuel Willard was born in 1640 to a wealthy parents and devoted to his Puritan Church. He was a major help in reconciling the community of Salem.
  • 1693 – Benjamin Fletcher served as Governor, of Pennsylvania, living in New York, in 1693.
  • 1693 – William of Orange or William III takes the throne of England from the unpopular James II, easing fears that James would try to turn the country Catholic again. William’s wife Mary also reigns.
  • 1693 – On February 8, a charter is granted and, William and Mary’s College is founded in Williamsburg, Virginia.
  • 1693 – Hugh Crotia, from Stratford, Connecticut, when tried for witchcraft, the jury found no bill. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial, of Hugh Crotia.
  • 1693 – Sarah Post of Andover, Massachusetts, was tried for the crime of practicing witchcraft. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Sarah Post.
  • 1694 – Nell Cane from King and Queen County, in the State of Virginia, Mrs. Ball’s accusation took the form of  the accused of having Ridden her twice. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Nell Cane.
  • 1693 – William Markham served as Deputy Governor, of Pennsylvania, He was seated in the Capital, at Philadelphia, in 1693.
  • 1694 – Phyllis Money, from Westmoreland County, in the State of Virginia, on the Eleventh day of January, was acquitted of witchcraft. She was countersued her accuser, William Earle for defamation, but received no damages. She was alleged to have cast a spell on Henry Dunkin’s horse, and to have taught her daughter, Dunkin’s wife to be a witch, and to have taught Dunkin to be a Wizard. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Phyllis Money.
  • 1694 – Samuel Carpenter served as Deputy Governor, of Pennsylvania, from 1694 to 1698. He was seated in  the Capital, at Philadelphia.
  • 1695 – Elizabeth Dunkin, from Westmoreland County, in the State of Virginia, was acquitted of witchcraft. Henry Dunkin accused John and Elizabeth Dunkin. She countersued for forty thousand pounds in damages, and received forty pounds. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Elizabeth Dunkin.
  • 1695 – James Dunkin, from Westmoreland County, in the State of Virginia, was acquitted of the crime of witchcraft. Henry Dunkin accused John and Elizabeth Dunkin. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of James Dunkin.
  • 1695 – Eleanor Morris, from King and Queen County, in the State of Virginia, was accused of sorcery, by Mrs. Ball. Mrs. Morris’s husband countersued for defamation, and received five hundred pounds. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Eleanor Morris.
  • 1696 – The Royal African Trading Co. no longer is exclusively involved in slave trading. Residents in the American Colonies began to sell slaves. Trade was to be done only on ships built in England. Trade restrictions were further tightened.
  • 1696 – That April, the Navigation Act of 1696 insists that American trade be conducted on ships built in Britain. This act broadens the duties of customs agents and requires bonds be posted on goods. The act also includes forcible entry.
  • 1697 – Winifred Benham, of the Town of Hartford, Hartford County, in the State of Connecticut, was excommunicated , but also, acquitted, of the crime of witchcraft. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Winifred Benham.
  • 1697 – Winifred Benham, of the Town of Hartford, Hartford County, in the State of Connecticut, was excommunicated , but also, acquitted, of the crime of witchcraft. She was the daughter of the above Winifred Benham. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Winifred Benham.
  • 1697 – Grace Sherwood from the Town of Norfolk, Princess Anne County, in the State of Virginia. She was acquitted of witchcraft and then countersued the accuser for defamation, on the Fourth day of February. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Grace Sherwood.
  • 1697 – James Sherwood from the Town of Norfolk, Princess Anne County, in the State of Virginia. He was acquitted of witchcraft and then countersued the accuser for defamation, on the Fourth day of February, in 1697. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of James Sherwood.
  • 1697 – The Massachusetts court expresses regret over the witch trials of 1692. Jurors sign a statement of regret and remuneration is given to the families of the accused.
  • 1697 – That September, King William’s War is over, with the signing of Treaty of Ryswick.
  • 1698 – Anne Byrd from the Town of Norfolk, Princess Anne County, in the State of Virginia. She was acquitted of witchcraft and then countersued the accuser for defamation, on the Eighth day of August, in 1698. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial or Anne Byrd.
  • 1698 – John Byrd from the Town of Norfolk, Princess Anne County, in the State of Virginia. He was acquitted of witchcraft and then countersued the accuser for defamation, on the Eighth day of August, in 1698. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial or John Byrd.
  • 1698 – Grace Sherwood from the Town of Norfolk, Princess Anne County, in the State of Virginia. She was acquitted if witchcraft and then countersued the accuser for defamation, on the Tenth day of September, in 1698 We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Grace Sherwood.
  • 1698 – James Sherwood from the Town of Norfolk, Princess Anne County, in the State of Virginia. He was acquitted of witchcraft and then countersued the accuser for defamation, on the Tenth day of September, in 1698. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of James Sherwood.
  • 1698 – The settlement of Colchester was founded in Connecticut.
  • 1698 – Elias Ball, known as Red Cap leaves England for America to claim the land he inherited. The plantation is named Comingtee and lies along the Cooper River, in South Carolina. The Ball family kept a history. (In 1998 Edward Ball has the book printed, calling it “Slaves in the Family”. )
  • 1698 – The Virginia state house at Jamestown, and the capital is then, moved to Williamsburg.
  • 1698 – Connecticut chooses Fitz-John Winthrop as governor. He is the son of John Winthrop and Elizabeth Reade.
  • 1699 – Williamsburg serves as the capital of Virginia until 1780.
  • 1699 – England’s Wool Act prohibited the export of wool from the American Colonies.
  • 1699 – William Penn held the position of Proprietor of the State of Pennsylvania. He was seated, in the Capital in Philadelphia.
  • 1700 – The Population of Anglo American reaches 275,000.
  • 1700 – Massachusetts and New York ordered Roman Catholic priests to leave those states or suffer death or imprisonment.
  • 1701 – The General Assembly in Connecticut authorizes the Collegiate School.
  • 1701 – Andrew Hamilton served as Deputy Governor, from 1701 to 1703. He was seated at the capital, in Philadelphia.
  • 1701 – The City of Detroit is founded by the French.
  • 1702 – William III dies. Anne, his sister-in-law and James’s daughter is next in line for the British Throne.
  • 1702 – Anne becomes Queen of England. Charles II of Spain dies. England declares war on France to prevent Spain and France from joining forces. Queen Anne’s War begins.
  • 1702 – The East and West Jersey Proprietorships end. New Jersey becomes a royal colony under authority of the governor of New York.
  • 1702 – England’s Queen Anne orders Lord Cornbury to found the Royal African Company.
  • 1702 – The colonies bordering Canada suffer attacks from the French and Native Americans.
  • 1702 – The Spanish town of St. Augustine, Florida is attacked by South Carolina Militia.
  • 1702 – New Jersey’s two parts become one royal colony.
  • 1702 – The Colleigiate is founded in Connecticut. Later it becomes Yale.
  • 1702 – The Anglican Church become the official church of Maryland.
  • 1702 – Katherine Prout, from Charles County, Maryland, was technically not a Witchcraft Trial, but rather Charles Killiburn brought suit against the “Witch”. She was fined one hundred pounds of Tobacco. He later, sued her for slander and was awarded eleven hundred pounds of tobacco. She counter sued one of the witnesses for slandering her. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Katherine Prout.
  • 1703 – Edward Shippen served as President of Council, in Pennsylvania, of the capital, in Philadelphia, from 1703 to 1704.
  • 1703 – The colony of Delaware, Originally part of New Sweden, separates from Pennsylvania, to form a government of its own.
  • 1704 – John Evans served as Deputy Governor, in the State of Pennsylvania, He was seated, at the Capital in Philadelphia, from 1704 to 1709.
  • 1704 – The Boston Newsletter becomes the first lasting newspaper in the American Colonies.
  • 1705 – The Virginia Black Code of 1705 means that runaway slaves can be put to death, if caught over forty miles north of Albany, New York.
  • 1705 – Massachusetts passes a law making it illegal, for blacks and whites to marry.
  • 1705 – Grace Sherwood from the Town of Norfolk, Princess Anne County, in the State of Virginia, after declining to appear before the court, for the witchcraft trial, she was arrested and put to the Water Test. She was remanded to the county jail and clapped in irons. The record ends there, although there is a record of her will being written, on the Twentieth day of August, in 1733. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial of Grace Sherwood.
  • 1706 – Charleston, South Carolina is attacked by the French and the Spanish.
  • 1706 – On July 10, Grace Sherwood, also known as the Witch of Pungo in Virginia, stands trial for witchcraft. The trial is by water. She floats which means she is guilty. She spends almost 8 years in prison. She dies in 1740.
  • 1706 – Founding father, Benjamin Franklin is born.
  • 1706 – The Anglican Church becomes the official church of South Carolina.
  • 1708 – The Saybrook Platform permits churches to join a regional association.
  • 1708 – Increase Mather is a major figure in bringing the population back to religion; when faith had fallen off.
  • 1708 – The first census in Rhode Island is taken with a population of 7,181.
  • 1709 – September 3, a large group of German settlers comes to the Carolinas.
  • 1709 – Charles Gookin served as Deputy Governor,for Pennsylvania, He was seated in the Capital of Philadelphia, from 1709 to 1717.
  • 1710 – The Post Office Act, creates the postal system in the American Colonies, governed by the Postmaster in London and a deputy in New York City.
  • 1710 – The British captured the French city of Port Royal in Acadia (now Nova Scotia).
  • 1711 – The British attacks on Montreal and Quebec were throated.
  • 1711 –The city of Beaufort, South Carolina is founded. Beaufort is known as the second oldest city in South Carolina.
  • 1711 –The Tuscarora Indian War starts over settlers moving west in North Carolina. Some Native Americans massacre settlers.
  • 1712 –Queen Anne’s War end when the Armistice is declared.
  • 1712 –Carolina was divided into North and South Carolina.
  • 1712 –South Carolina law demands church attendance and with no travel or work on Sundays.
  • 1712 –The first sperm whale was caught off the coast of Nantucket.
  • 1712 – William Penn became ill. His second wife, Hannah Callowhill took over the Proprietorship of the State.
  • 1712 – the Pennsylvania Assembly bans the importation of slaves.
  • 1712 Virtue Violl from  the Town of Annapolis, in the State of Maryland, was acquitted of witchcraft on the Tenth day of May, in 1712. She lived in Talbott County. We have no additional information, about the life, death of burial of Virtue Violl.
  • 1713 –Queen Anne’s War is officially over when the Peace of Utrecht is signed.
  • 1714 –Tea becomes part of the life of the American Colonies.
  • 1714 –Queen Anne dies, and her closest acceptable heir is George I, who is of German descent. The Hanovers begin their reign of England.
  • 1715 –On April 15, the Yamasee Native Americans rise up in South Carolina attacking settlements, and attempting to destroy the colony.
  • 1717 –The Collegiate School was moved to New Haven. The name was changed to Yale.
  • 1717 –Many Scots-Irish begin to settle in the western part of Pennsylvania. Germans, or Pennsylvania Dutch settle in this colony, as while.
  • 1717 – William Keith served as the Deputy Governor, of Pennsylvania. He was seated at the Capital in Philadelphia, from 1717 to 1726.
  • 1718 –The French founded the settlement of New Orleans.
  • 1718 –In May, the pirate Blackbeard or Edward Teach blockades the Charleston, South Carolina harbor with the French flagship or La Concorde, which he called Queen Anne’s Revenge. The ship held 40 guns.
  • 1718 –On November 22, Lt. Robert Maynard, commanding British troops, capture the English pirate, Edward Teach, also known as Blackbeard and Capt. Drummond, during a battle close to Ocracoke Island off the coast of North Carolina. The governor of Virginia put a price on his head, of 100 pounds.
  • 1720 – The population of Anglo American is 475,000.
  • 1721 – On May 29, South Carolina becomes a royal colony.
  • 1722 – Founding father, Samuel Adams is born.
  • 1724 – On March 6, Henry Laurens is born in South Carolina. His grandfather is Andre Laurens, a French Huguenot who comes to America in 1682. Henry’s father John Laurens marries Hester or Ester Grasset. Henry marries Eleanor Ball. Henry Laurens is important in the American Revolution and in Politics. His family is in the rice and slave businesses at this time.
  • 1724 – Sarah Spencer from the town of Colchester, New London County, in the State of Connecticut, accused of witchcraft, but awarded damages against John and Elizabeth Ackley of one shilling. We have no additional information, about the life, death or burial or Sarah Spencer.
  • 1725 – The population of African American slaves reaches 75,000.
  • 1725 – On December 11, George Mason is born at Gunston Hall Plantation, 20 miles south of Washington D. C. on the Potomac River. Mason outlines the Bill of Rights for the Virginia Convention in June 1776. Mason dies at Gunston Hall on October 7, 1792.
  • 1726 – Patrick Gordon served as the Deputy Governor, of Pennsylvania. He was seated at the Capital, in Philadelphia, from 1726 to 1736.
  • 1726 – The pillories and stocks are torn down and burned as the poor riot in Philadelphia. The pillories and stocks were used for public scorning and punishment.
  • 1726 – By this time, there are 2,581 slaves in New Jersey.
  • 1727 – George II becomes King of England, when George I dies.
  • 1728 – The first synagogue is built by Jewish settlers in New York City.
  • 1729 – Benjamin Franklin publishes The Pennsylvania Gazette.
  • 1730 – The City of Baltimore is founded in the Colony of Maryland.
  • 1730 – The Census in Rhode Island is taken with a population of 17,935.
  • 1731 – Benjamin Franklin Founds the first public library in Philadelphia.
  • 1731 – Disagreements arise over boundary lines between New York and Connecticut.
  • 1732 – The only Catholic Church in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, says its first mass.
  • 1732 – James Oglethorpe founds Georgia, the 13th colony of the British empire in America.
  • 1732 – George Washington, patriot, founding father and President of the United States is born, in Virginia.
  • 1732 – Benjamin Franklin begins publishing Poor Richard’s Almanac, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
  • 1733 – On January 13, James Oglethorpe lands in Charleston, South Carolina, with 130 English settlers.
  • 1733 – The Molasses Act, imposes heavy duties on molasses, rum and sugar. Products coming from the Caribbean, and not under British control.
  • 1734 – New York publisher is accused of seditious libel spurring the Great Awakening; which opens up religious revival throughout the American Colonies. He is found innocent with a defense, of the truth is not libel.
  • 1734 – Daniel Boone, frontiersman, patriot and pioneer is born on November 2, in Berks County, Pennsylvania. His parents were Squire and Sarah Morgan Boone.
  • 1735 – Paul Revere, statesman, patriot is born. He is later immortalized in Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s poem, “Paul Revere’s Ride. ”
  • 1735 – The Great Awakening is helped by Jonathan Edwards, a Congregationalist minister. He preaches a number of sermons in Northampton Massachusetts. For the next ten years, religious revival travels throughout the American Colonies. George Whitefield plays a large part in this movement.
  • 1735 – February 18, The first opera is performed in America, in Charleston, South Carolina. The opera is “Flora. ”
  • 1735 – Brothers John and Charles Wesley sail from England to Georgia. Charles, to be secretary to James Oglethorpe. Wesley becomes a missionary to the Native Americans.
  • 1735 – John Adams, Statesman, Patriot and President of the United States of America, is born in Massachusetts.
  • 1735 – Button Gwinnet of Georgia, Signer of the Declaration of Independence is born in England.
  • 1735 – John Musgrove, trader and translator for James Oglethorpe dies in Savannah, Georgia.
  • 1735 – Moravian Church members settle in Georgia.
  • 1735 – Alice Riley is hanged for helping murder someone in Georgia. Reportedly her ghost is still seen today.
  • 1736 – James Oglethorpe and company have English orders to build a fort on St. Simons Island,off the coast of Georgia.
  • 1736 – On May 29, Patrick Henry, American patriot and governor of Virginia, is born. He is a slave owner and justifies this by saying: “I am driven along by the general inconvenience of living without them. ”
  • 1736 – A group of Scottish Highlanders settle on the Altamaha River and call it New Inverness (now Darien), Georgia.
  • 1736 – James Oglethorpe sees to the building of Fort Frederica, and goes to England to report to the Trustees on the progress of the Georgia Colony.
  • 1736 – James Logan served as President of Council, in 1736, in Pennsylvania. He was seated at the Capital in Philadelphia.
  • 1737 – While in England, James Oglethorpe visits Parliament. He gets funds and 600 soldiers for Georgia. He is named “Colonel of the Regiment of the Foot for the Defense of His Majesty’s Plantations in America”. He then sails home to Georgia.
  • 1737 – William Stephens is named secretary for the colony by Georgia Trustees.
  • 1737 – Construction is started on Fort Augusta, north of Savannah, Georgia and across the River.
  • 1737 – George Whitefield is commissioned by the Trustees to serve as Minister to Georgia. He replaces John Wesley.
  • 1737 – The first cooper coins are minted in Connecticut.
  • 1738 – James Habersham, who becomes one of Georgia’s most important People.
  • 1738 – The Prince of Wales is born in England. He will become King George III.
  • 1738 – New Jersey becomes a separate royal colony, leaving New York’s authority. The new royal governor of New Jersey is Lewis Morris.
  • 1738 – By this time, there are about 4,000 slaves in New Jersey.
  • 1738 – Some Georgia settles petition the Trustee to allow slavery in the colony. They are called “Malcontents” James Oglethorpe objects to this.
  • 1738 – George Thomas served as Deputy Governor, of Pennsylvania. He was seated at the Capital in Philadelphia, from 1738 to 1747.
  • 1739 – England declare war on Spain. This causes war between Spanish Florida and Georgia andSouth Carolina. Which causes violence among African American slaves in South Carolina.
  • 1739 – Yamacraw Chief, Tomochichi dies and is buried in Percival Square (now Wright Square), Georgia. James Oglethorpe is one of his pall bearers.
  • 1739 – George Whitefield is granted 500 acres by the Georgia Trustees to build an orphan home in Savannah.
  • 1739 – On September 9, a slave uprising in Stono, South Carolina results in twenty some deaths among whites. The leader is an Angolan called Jemmy. There were three slave riots in 1739 in South Carolina. After this, laws are passed called the black codes, to restrict all areas of a slaves life.
  • 1739 – James Oglethorpe and the Creek Chiefs sign the Treaty of Coweta on the Chattahoochee River. This treaty reaffirms the Treaty of Savannah in 1733. The new treaty also specifies which lands are available to the Georgia colonists.
  • 1739 – In 1731, during the conflict between England and Spain, Capt. Robert Jenkin’s ear was cut off by the Spanish for attacking Spanish ships. This began the War of Jenkin’s Ear.
  • 1740 – The War of Austrian Succession, in Europe, is King George’s War in the American Colonies. With the death of Emperor Charles VI, France and Spain combine forces against England.
  • 1740 – James Oglethorpe leads a militia from Georgia and South Carolina, and Native Americans to attack the Spanish at St. Augustine. They, then captured a fort and attacked Fort Mose. They lost a number of men and fled to St. Simons Island, Georgia.
  • 1740 – Fifty slaves are hanged in Charleston, South Carolina, because a slave plot is discovered.
  • 1740 – George Whitefield named the orphan’s home in Savannah, Georgia, Bethesda.
  • 1740 – Edward and William Pattison set up a tinware works in Berlin, Connecticut.
  • 1741 – King George II issues boundary lines between Massachusetts and New Hampshire.
  • 1741 – Benning Wentworth becomes the new governor of New Hampshire.
  • 1741 – In April, the Trustees separated Georgia into two counties. North of Savannah River, became Savannah County. South of the Savannah County became Frederica County.
  • 1741 – William Stephens, formerly secretary of the Georgia Trustees, becomes the president of the County of Savannah.
  • 1741 – Peter the Great, Tsar of Russia, sponsors Virus Bering, a Danish navigator to explore the Alaskan coast.
  • 1742 – William Stephens is appointed president of the entire Georgia Colony.
  • 1742 – July 7, James Oglethorpe and a force of Scottish Highlanders, defends St. Simons Island against the Spanish from St. Augustine, in the Battle of Bloody Marsh.
  • 1742 – Nathanael Greene is born August 7, in Rhode Island. Many counties across the country are named for Greene; because he is a Revolutionary War Hero.
  • 1743 – James Oglethorpe and his militia, again repel the Spanish at St. Simons Island, Georgia. Oglethorpe is made a brigadier general for his efforts.
  • 1743 – On April 13, Thomas Jefferson, the third president of the United States is born, in what is now Albemarle County, Virginia. He calls slavery cruel; but includes 25 slaves in his daughter’s dowry. He takes child slaves to market and has 10 year old slaves working 12 hour days in a nail supply. He states that blacks are “in reason inferior” and “in imagination they are dull, tasteless and anormalous. Were it left to me to decide whether we should have a government without newspapers, or newspapers without a government, I should not hesitate a moment to prefer the latter. History, in general, only informs us what bad government is. ”
  • 1743 – The American Philosophical Society of Philadelphia is established by Benjamin Franklin and A group of friends.
  • 1743 – James Oglethorpe sails for England to settle his finances. He had helped the Georgia colony by borrowing from his family estate.
  • 1743 – David Emanuel is born in Pennsylvania. He will become the Governor of Georgia.
  • 1744 – The Georgia colony has difficulty finding a sustaining crop.
  • 1744 – James Habersham institutes the first profitable company for shipping goods to England.
  • 1744 – John Houstoun is born. He becomes chief justice and Governor of Georgia.
  • 1745 – As King George’s War spills over into the colonies, the French privateers using Louisbourg, Nova Scotia, Canada, as a fortress and base, start attacking New England fishermen working on the Grand Banks.
  • 1745 – New Englanders under William Pepperrell, with support from Sir Peter Warren and a fleet of merchants force the surrender of Louisbourg, Nova Scotia, Canada.
  • 1745 – In March, James Oglethorpe is made a major general, in the British army, because of hisefforts in Georgia.
  • 1745 – James Habersham Jr. is born. He becomes Speaker of the Georgia Assembly twice and serves on the Board of Trustees that founds the University of Georgia.
  • 1746 – John Treutlen comes to Frederica, Georgia. He becomes the first state governor of Georgia.
  • 1746 – George Whitefield wrote account on the Bethesda orphan home, March 21, 1746, “In Their Own Words”. This is about the idea and building of the home.
  • 1746 – The College of New Jersey is chartered. The school is now Princeton University.
  • 1747 – The New York Bar Association is established in New York City.
  • 1747 – Anthony Palmer served as President of Council, of Pennsylvania. He was seated at the Capital, in Philadelphia, in 1747.
  • 1748 – The Rhode Island Census is taken with a population of 32,773.
  • 1748 – Lord Thomas Fairfax, a Virginia land owner, commissions a survey of the Patterson Creek area, which became part of West Virginia. The surveyor shared the journey with the nephew, of Fairfax and George Washington, age 16. The survey was a poor one.
  • 1748 – The Horseshoe Riots were riots over land. They went on through 1753.
  • 1748 – Louisbourg, Nova Scotia, Canada is given back to the French upon the signing of the Treaty Of Aix-la-Chapelle, which ends finally ends King George’s War.
  • 1748 – James Hamilton served as the Deputy Governor, of Pennsylvania. He was seated at the Capital, in Philadelphia, from 1748 to 1754.
  • 1750 – The Iron Act restricts iron production in the American Colonies.
  • 1750 – The Spanish Treasure ship, La Galga sinks off the coast of Virginia.
  • 1750 – The Wilton Mansion on the James River in Virginia is built for William Randolph III, and his wife, Anne Carter Harrison and their 8 children. It was moved to West Richmond and is now the headquarters of the National Society of the Colonial Dames of America. The home takes over 2 years to build.
  • 1751 – On March 16, James Madison is born in Port Conway, Virginia. Madison becomes a secretary Of state, and the forth president of the United States. He created the Electoral College system, he says, “to break the tyranny of majority. ”“If men were angels, no government would be necessary. ”
  • 1751 – The Currency Act bans paper money in American Colonies.
  • 1752 – The first general hospital is established in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
  • 1753 – Benjamin Franklin and William Hunter are appointed as postmasters general for the American Colonies.
  • 1753 – On August 10, Edmund Jennings Randolph is born. He becomes the first attorney general of the United States.
  • 1753 – In October, Robert Dinwiddie, governor of Virginia calls a meeting to discuss the eviction of British colonists from homesteads west of the Appalachian Mountains by French troops Stationed in Canada. Major George Washington volunteered to deliver the letter about the unlawful intrusion, to the French in the Ohio Valley.
  • 1753 – On December 14, French Captain Jacques Le Gardeur rejects the claims of British to the landsin the Ohio Valley. The Captain says he will see that his superiors in Canada receive the letter from Virginia Governor Dinwiddie.
  • 1754 – The Seven Years War breaks out in Europe. The War is called the French and Indian War, in the American Colonies. Much of the dispute is over the Ohio River Valley.
  • 1754 – The Susquehanna Company purchases some land in Pennsylvania for 2,000 pounds from the Iroquois Native Americans. This land is about one third of Pennsylvania and included land belonging to other Native American groups and Connecticut.
  • 1754 – On April 2, a troop of 159 men under the command of Lt. Col. George Washington arrives at Will’s Creek and learns the French had taken Fort Prince George from the British and renamed it Fort Duquesne.
  • 1754 – In December, Lt. Col. George Washington resigns his commission.
  • 1754 – On June 19, the Albany Congress opened. New York colonial Gov. George Clinton called the meeting to discuss better relations with the Native Americans and common defense measures against the French. Attendees included Native Americans, and representatives from New York, Connecticut, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania and Rhode Island. Benjamin Franklin attended and proposed a Plan of Union, which was adopted, by the conference.
  • 1754 – George Washington rents Mount Vernon from Anne Fairfax, the widow of his half-brother Lawrence.
  • 1754 – Robert Hunter Morris served as Deputy of Pennsylvania, from 1754 to 1756. He was seated at the Capital in Philadelphia.
  • 1755 – England commits 2000 troops under Gen. Braddock to the American Colonies to fight the French and Indians.
  • 1755 – George Washington volunteers to serve as an aide to British General Edward Braddock. Braddock came to America to force the French out of the Ohio River Valley. The campaign failed, but Washington was hailed as a hero. At the Battle of Monongahela, Washington had four bullets shot through his coat, yet was not hurt. With so many officers injured during the battles, Washington was instrumental in carrying out Braddock’s orders of retreat. Shortly afterward, Washington was put in charge of Virginia’s forces trying to defend the Virginia’s frontier from raiding French and Indian’s.
  • 1755 – When General Braddock is killed; he is replaced by Massachusetts Governor William Shirley as the new commander.
  • 1755 – The Census is taken in Rhode Island with a population of 40,414.
  • 1755 – Nathan Hale is born in Coventry, Connecticut.
  • 1755 – The first newspaper of Connecticut called the Connecticut Gazette is printed by James Parker in New Haven, Connecticut.
  • 1755 – Alexander Hamilton is born. He becomes a statesman, patriot and Secretary of the Treasury of the United States of America.
  • 1756 – England declares war on France, as French and Indian War flows into Europe.
  • 1756 – On April 14, Governor James Glen of South Carolina objects to the Acadia Indians landing on his shore. The Acadians were told they were not welcome in their Canadian homeland. The British loaded them on ships bound for South Carolina among other places. For specific names please see the chapter on Ships and Passenger lists.
  • 1756 – The College of New Jersey is called Prince Town to honor Prince William of Orange and Nassau. He is also William III. Nassau Hall is the largest school building in the American Colonies, at the time. In 1776, the building became the first capitol of New Jersey. The Continental Congress meets there in 1783.
  • 1756 – William Denny served as Deputy Governor, of Pennsylvania, from 1756 to 1759. He was seated, at the Capital in Philadelphia.
  • 1757 – William Pitt becomes England’s Secretary of State, with new policies on war.
  • 1758 – English lose 2,000 men at French hands at Fort Ticonderoga.
  • 1758 – April 28, James Monroe, is born in Westmoreland County, Virginia. He becomes a secretary of state and the fifth president of the United States.
  • 1758 – On July 24, George Washington becomes a member of the Virginia House of Burgesses.
  • 1758 – The first Indian reservation in the American Colonies is established in New Jersey. Native Americans are relocated to the Brotherton Reservation in Burlington County by the New Jersey Assembly.
  • 1758 – In Trenton, a barracks is built to house British soldiers as winter quarters.
  • 1759 – Fort Niagara is taken away from the French by the English.
  • 1759 – English takes Quebec in battle. English General James Wolf is killed. American General Phillip Schuyler survives. French General Marquis de Montcalm is wounded and dies the next day.
  • 1759 – War breaks out between the Cherokee Native Americans and the southern colonies.
  • 1759 – George Washington Married Martha Dandridge Custis, a wealthy widow with land, property, slaves and two young children. Washington adds additions on to Mount Vernon.
  • 1759 – James Hamilton served as the Deputy Governor, of Pennsylvania, from 1759 to 1763. He was seated at the Capital, in Philadelphia.
  • 1760 – Population in American Colonies reaches 1,500,000.
  • 1760 – On February 16, the Cherokee Native Americans, being held at Fort St. George, South Carolina are killed, as a reaction to attacks on pioneer settlements.
  • 1760 – Most of Boston, Massachusetts goes up in flames.
  • 1760 – French Quebec finally surrenders to the English.
  • 1760 – George III becomes King of England upon the death of George II.
  • 1762 – England declares war on Spain.
  • 1762 – The new colonists in Pennsylvania often were attacked by Native Americans. Some went back to Connecticut after many deaths.
  • 1762 – August 22, Ann Franklin became the first woman editor of an American newspaper, the Newport, Rhode Island Mercury.
  • 1763 – On December 2, Touro Shul, the oldest existing American synagogue is dedicated in Newport, Rhode Island.
  • 1763 – The Brick State House is built on the New Haven Green in Connecticut.
  • 1763 – William Franklin becomes the last royal colonial governor of New Jersey.
  • 1763 – The French and Indian war ends, with England gaining all territory east of the Mississippi River, except New Orleans. England gets Florida. Spain gets Cuba. The Ottawa Native Americans begin a war against the British with the siege of Detroit. The British defeat the Ottawa at Pittsburgh. Ottawa Native Americans are led by Chief Pontiac.
  • 1763 – The English Proclamation of 1763 says no settlement of land west of the Appalachian Mountains, and settlers there must return, because of hostile Native Americans.
  • 1763 – John Penn served as Lieutenant Governor, of Pennsylvania, from 1763 to 1771. He was seated at the Capital in Philadelphia. John Penn was the second oldest son of William Penn the founder of Pennsylvania. He was the son of the founder’s second wife, Hannah Callowhill. John Penn was born on the Twenty-ninth day of February, in 1700.
  • 1764 – Thomas Green starts printing the Connecticut Courant in Hartford, Connecticut; the oldest American newspaper still in existence today.
  • 1764 – The Sugar act is imposed to pay for the French and Indian War. This Act includes other goods as well, and doubles the duties on goods reshipped from England.
  • 1764 – The Currency Act forbids the issuing any legal tender paper money.
  • 1764 – A one hundred ton brigantine called the Sally set off from Providence, Rhode Island, to West Africa. The ship was owned by Nicholas Brown and Company. A merchant firm of four brothers Nicholas, John, Joseph and Moses Brown. Of the 196 Africans purchased by ship’s master, Esek Hopkins, over 109 died by suicide, starvation, disease and failed insurrection.
  • 1765 – The Stamp Act imposed a direct tax, by passing local government, and going to England. This applied to all printed materials.
  • 1765 – The Quartering Act meant that the colonists must house and feed British troops.
  • 1765 – On May 29, Patrick Henry condemns the Stamp Act in Virginia’s House of Burgesses. It during this speech that it is said, Henry responses to cries of “Treason” by saying, “If this be treason, make the most of it. ”
  • 1765 – The Sons of Liberty use violence to stop British agents, and stop merchants from buying British goods.
  • 1765 – A mob attacks the home of Thomas Hutchinson, Chief Justice of Massachusetts. The family escapes.
  • 1765 – The Stamp Act Congress sends King George III a resolution, which requests the repeal of the Acts of 1764 and 1765.
  • 1766 – New York refuses to comply with the Quartering Act.
  • 1766 – On February 11, The Stamp Act was condemned as unconstitutional by the colony of Virginia.
  • 1766 – Governor William Franklin of New Jersey signs the charter for Queen’s College in honor of England’s Queen Charlotte. The school began in 1771, at the Sign of the Red Lion Tavern at the corner of Albany and Neilson Streets.
  • 1766 – England repeals the Stamp Act. That same day, The Declaratory Act states that Britain has the to legislate any laws governing the American Colonies in all cases, whatsoever.
  • 1766 –Violence breaks out over the Quartering Act. The New York Legislature is suspended by the crown.
  • 1766 – Connecticut Governor Thomas Finch, who was accepting of the Stamp Act, loses to new Governor William Pitkin.
  • 1767 – Thomas and Samuel Green start a Newspaper which becomes the New Haven Journal-Courier.
  • 1767 – On March 15, Andrew Jackson is born in Waxhaw, South Carolina. He is a hero of the War of 1812, an Indian fighter, a Tennessee Attorney, and the seventh President of the United States of America.
  • 1767 – England passes the Revenue Act. This act imposes a tax on even more imports. Boston and other colonists decide to boycott these goods.
  • 1767 –The Townshend Acts put duties on the importation on glass, lead, paint, paper and tea,among other goods. This leads to a boycott of English products.
  • 1768 –The Revenue Act is repealed.
  • 1768 –Two English regiments land in Boston.
  • 1768 – Thomas Jefferson, becomes a member of the House of Burgesses of Virginia.
  • 1769 – New Jersey, Rhode Island and North Carolina join the boycott of English goods.
  • 1769 – San Diego, California is founded by Friar Juniper Serra of the Franciscan Order.
  • 1769 – Connecticut takes control over the Susquehanna Company territory in Northern Pennsylvania.
  • 1769 – Rhode Island settlers burn the British ship Liberty at Newport. One of the first acts of rebellion in the American Colonies.
  • 1770 – Population of the American Colonies has risen to 2,210,000.
  • 1770 – The Boston Massacre happens when a mob harasses British troops, who fire on the crowd. 5 are dead. 6 are wounded. Governor of Massachusetts, Thomas Hutchinson withdraws British troop, at Samuel Adams insistence. British Capt. Thomas Preston is arrested with 8 of his men and charged with murder.
  • 1770 – British repeal the Townshend Acts except for the one on tea.
  • 1770 – On August 1, William Clark is born in Charlottesville, Virginia. He and Meriwether Lewis leadthe Corps of Discovery to explore the west, at the direction of President Thomas Jefferson, in 1803.
  • 1770 – Boston Massacre Trial with Colonial lawyers John Adams and Josiah Quincy defending Capt. Preston and the others, who were all acquitted. 2 others were found guilty of manslaughter,branded and released.
  • 1771 – Mark Catesby writes, “The Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands. ”His Work is printed in London. It took Catesby almost thirty years to write and and compile all the drawings from his own hand.
  • 1771 – Richard Penn served as the Lieutenant Governor of the State of Pennsylvania, from 1771 to 1773. He was seated, at the capital in Philadelphia. Richard Penn was the second son of Richard Penn, and the grandson the founder of Pennsylvania, and his second wife, Hannah Callowhill. Richard Penn was born about 1735 in England and died on the Twenty-seventh day of May, in 1811.
  • 1772 – Colonists attack British schooner, the Gaspee, after it runs aground. They set the crew ashore, and burn the ship. The offenders were to be sent to England. This inflamed the colonists.
  • 1773 – The first Museum on the North American Continent is founded in Charleston, South Carolina.
  • 1773 – February 9, William Henry Harrison was born at the Berkeley Plantation, which was near Richmond, Virginia. Harrison became the 9th president of the United States. He had the shortest term of any of the presidents, one month. William Henry Harrison died on the Fourth day of April, in 1841.
  • 1773 – Virginia House of Burgesses appoints a committee to communicate with other colonies about common complaints against the British. Committee members include:Thomas Jefferson, Patrick Henry, and Richard Henry Lee. Other colonies follow suit.
  • 1773 – The Tea Act takes effect. It gives the British East India Company a monopoly by allowing itto sell directly to agents, and underselling American merchants. The company is allowed to ship half a million pounds of tea to chosen agents.
  • 1773 – A huge crowd comes to hear Samuel Adams tells them of Governor Thomas Hutchinson’s order, that the tea tax be paid before the ship leaves the harbor. That night colonists, dressed as Mohawk Indians dump the tea overboard. This is known as the Boston Tea Party.
  • 1773 – John Randolph, a state representative from Virginia, says of Edward Livingston, a later mayor of New York, a senator from Louisiana and United States Secretary of State, that he “shines and stinks like a mackerel by moonlight. ”
  • 1773 – John Penn served as Lieutenant Governor, of Pennsylvania, from 1773 to 1776. He was seated at the capital, in Philadelphia.
  • 1774 – The English pass the Coercive Acts, called the Intolerable Acts by colonists. This is because of the rebellion. The Boston Port Bill closes commercial shipping in Boston, until the tea and the tax on the tea are paid.
  • 1774 – Boston boycotts British imports. General Thomas Gage and 4 regiments of British troops institute military rule in Massachusetts, replacing Governor Hutchinson.
  • 1774 – The English pass more Coercive Acts. The Massachusetts Regulating Act and the Government Act. This ended self-rule by the colonists. Political power controlled by the Royal governor, not the colonists. The Administration of Justice Act protects royal officials from being suedin colonial courts. The Quebec Act meant that Canada controlled territories claimed by Massachusetts, Connecticut and Virginia.
  • 1774 – A new version of the 1765 Quartering Act is passed, requiring the colonies to house British troops in homes, taverns and unoccupied buildings. Governor Gage seizes the colonies’ arsenal of weapons at Charlestown.
  • 1774 – Rhode Island becomes the first colony to prohibit the importation of slaves.
  • 1774 – The Census is taken in Rhode Island with a population of 57,707.
  • 1774 – The First Continental Congress meets in Carpenter’s Hall, Philadelphia, from September 5, to October 26, with 56 delegates from every colony except Georgia.
  • 1774 – Connecticut sends Silas Deane, Eliphiat Dyer and Roger Sherman as representatives to the First Continental Congress.
  • 1774 – Delaware sends Thomas McKean, George Read and Caesar Rodney to the First Continental Congress.
  • 1774 – Maryland sends Samuel Chase, Robert Goldsborough, Thomas Johnson, William Paca and Matthew Tilghman to the First Continental Congress.
  • 1774 – Massachusetts Bay sends John Adams, Samuel Adams, Thomas Cushing and Robert Treat Paine to the First Continental Congress.
  • 1774 – New Hampshire sends Nathaniel Folsom and John Sullivan to the First Continental Congress.
  • 1774 – New Jersey sends Stephen Crane, John De Hart, James Kinsey, William Livingston and Richard Smith to the First Continental Congress.
  • 1774 – New York sends John Alsop, Simon Boerum, James Duane, William Floyd, John Jay, Philip Livingston, Isaac Low and Henry Wisner to the First Continental Congress.
  • 1774 – North Carolina sends Richard Caswell, Joseph Hewes and William Hooper to the Firs Continental Congress.
  • 1774 – Pennsylvania sends Edward Biddle, John Dickinson, Joseph Galloway, Charles Humphreys, Thomas Miffin, John Morton and George Ross to the First Continental Congress.
  • 1774 – Rhode Island sends Stephen Hopkins and Samuel Ward to the First Continental Congress.
  • 1774 – South Carolina sends Christopher Gadsden, Thomas Lynch, Jr. , Henry Middleton, Edward Rutledge and John Rutledge to the First Continental Congress.
  • 1774 – May 28, Virginia sends Richard Bland, Benjamin Harrison, Patrick Henry, Richard henry Lee, Edmund Pendleton, Peyton Randolph and George Washington to the First ContinentalCongress.
  • 1774 – Peyton Randolph is elected President of the First Continental Congress.
  • 1774 – On August 18, Meriwether Lewis is born in Charlottesville, Virginia. He and William Clark lead the Corps of Discovery to explore the West, at the direction of President Thomas Jefferson, in 1803.
  • 1774 – The Congress says the Coercive Acts are not to be obeyed. It asks for the formation of local militias. A Declaration and Resolves is passed opposing the Coercive Acts, the Quebec Act and other measures which limit self-rule. The colonists speak of rights to “life, liberty and property”. The Congress agree to a Continental Association, which will boycott British imports, place an embargo on exports to England and end the slave trade.
  • 1774 – On October 14, Patrick Henry, speaking of his love of country says, “I am not a Virginian, but an American.
  • 1774 – Thomas Jefferson, writes a “Summary View of the Rights of British America. ”He then retires from his law practice.
  • 1775 – The first Chamber of Commerce on the North American Continent is founded in Charleston, South Carolina.
  • 1775 – January 11, Francis Salvador becomes the first Jewish person elected to public office in South Carolina and all of North America.
  • 1775 – In Cambridge, MA. , a colonial congress, which included John Hancock and Joseph Warren, began to prepare for war. England declares Massachusetts, in a state of rebellion. In Virginia, Patrick Henry makes a speech against England ending in “Give me liberty, or give me death”.
  • 1775 – The New England Restraining Act requires New England to trade with Britain only, and banned fishing in the North Atlantic.
  • 1775 – Massachusetts Governor Gage is ordered to enforce the Coercive Acts on the colonist by any means needed.
  • 1775 – General and Governor Gage ordered 700 British troops to Concord destroy the Colonists’ weapons. Paul Revere, William Dawes and many others were sent out from Boston to Lexington, and other places. Samuel Adams and John Hancock were at Lexington. These men tried to warn as many colonists as possible on the night of April 18, 1775.
  • 1775 – April 19, 70 of the Massachusetts militia stand at Lexington to face the British. The “shot heard around the world”, rang out, which begins the American Revolution. No one knows who fired the first shot. The British return fire; then charge with bayonets, which leaves eight colonists dead and ten wounded. The British, then destroy the weapons. Another incident occurred at the North Bridge in Concord; a British platoon was attacked. This resulted in more casualties. The British, then retreat to Boston, suffering about 250 casualties by rebels along the way. The news of these events spread quickly through the colonies.
  • 1775 – The Provincial Congress of Massachusetts orders an army be assembled. 13,600 volunteers answer the call. They begin a year long siege of Boston, controlled by the British.
  • 1776 – Rhode Island becomes the first colony to declare its independence from Great Britain on May 4.