American Revolution Loyalists (U-Z)


Underhill, Private William

Private William Underhill served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private William Underhill’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no other knowledge about Private William Underhill.

Underwood, Captain Benjamin (Ben)

Captain Benjamin Underwood served starting in North Carolina. His unit’s commanding officer was Colonel David Fanning. Captain Benjamin Underwood was a member of a regiment from the Loyalist Militia in the State of North Carolina. This campaign commenced on the 1st of March in 1781 and ended on the 24th of August in 1782. Captain Benjamin Underwood and his troops, who were responsible for the refugees from North Carolina and South Carolina from 1781 through 1782. We have no further information about the life or military career of Captain Benjamin Underwood.

Vickers, Benjamin

Benjamin Vickers was a member of the community of Loyalists, in North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as other states, began confiscating almost all of the Loyalist’s lands. The states, then sold most of the lands to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On March the 14th, of 1786, Benjamin Vickers lost more than 114 acres of land, to confiscation, in Edgecombe County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same more than 114 acres, to Noah Sugg, for the sum of 201 pounds, in British money.

On March the 14th, of 1786, Benjamin Vickers lost 400 acres of land , to confsication, in Edgecombe County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 400 acres, to Charles Garrard, for the sum of 752 pounds, in British money.

Wade, Private James

Private James Wade served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private James Wade’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no additional details about Private James Wade.

Wallace and Company

Wallace and Company were Loyalists in North Carolina. We don’t know who Wallace or the Company was. We don’t know whether the company was his company, one he represented or a number of business associates. We have no more details of the life, death or burial of the man known as Wallace, or his friends or business partners.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Wallace and Company lost 166 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bertie County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 166 acres, to John Pouns, for the sum of 260 pounds, in British money.

Watson, Major John

Major John Watson was from Anson County, North Carolina. He was the commanding officer of his unit. Major John Watson’s term of service began in 1781 and ended on the 17 of January, 1782. We have no further information about Major John Watson.

Weeks, Ensign

Ensign Weeks was born in America. He volunteered in North Carolina at the age of 16. Ensign Weeks began his military career between 1777 and 1783. His first name is not known. We have no other knowledge about Ensign Weeks life, death or military career.

West, Private David

Private David West served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private David West’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no further information about Private David West’s life, death or military career.

West, Private Isaac

Private Isaac West was a member of the Loyalist North Carolina Militia. Private Isaac West’s first name was sometimes spelled Issac. The commanding officer of his Company was Colonel Joseph Hunt. Private Isaac West was one of the men involved in a stoppage (or injury). He was placed in the His Majesty’s Hospital at Wilmington, in Brunswick County, North Carolina. Private Isaac West was one, of the men in the hospital, from 9th of April in 1781 through, 24th of April in 1781, both days inclusive. He received a payment, after he was wounded. We have no additional details of the life, death or military career.

West, Private James

Private James West served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private James West’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was first, a refugee of North Carolina, or South Carolina. We have no other knowledge about Private James West’s life, death or military.

Whisenhunt, Sergeant Conrod

Sergeant Conrod Whisenhunt served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Sergeant Conrod Whisenhunt’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North Carolina or South Carolina. We have no additional details about Sergeant Conrod Whisenhunt’s life, death or military career.

Whisenhunt, Private Peter

Private Peter Whisenhunt served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Peter Whisenhunt’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no further information about Private Peter Whisenhunt’s life, death or military career.

Whisenhunt, Private Philip

Private Philip Whisenhunt served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Philip Whisenhunt’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no additional details about Private Philip Whisenhunt’s life, death or military career.

White, Governor

Governor White was a member of the Loyalist community, living in North Carolina. He was also, a landowner. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as the other states, began confiscating most of the Loyalist’s lands. The states, then sold almost all of the lands, to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On October the 24th, of 1786, Governor White lost 200 acres of land, to confiscation, in Tyrell County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 200 acres of land, to Nehemiah Long, for the sum of 2,096 pounds and 10 pennies, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786, Governor White lost 250 acres of land, to confiscation, in Tyrell County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 250 acres of land, to Nehemiah Long, for the sum of 2,620 pounds and 1 shilling, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786, Governor White lost 206 acres of land, to confiscation, in Tyrell County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 206 acres of land, to Hardy Murfree, for the sum of 2,013 pounds and 13 shillings, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786, Governor White lost 360 acres of land, to confiscation, in Tyrell County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 360 acres of land, to Humphrey Hardy, for the sum of 3,519 pounds, in British money.

White, James

James White was a Loyalist living in North Carolina. He was, also a landowner.At the end of the American Revolution, the individual states began confiscating almost all the Loyalist land. The states then, sold most of the land to the Patriots, or those, who fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On November the 15th, of 1787, James White lost 1/2 acre of land, to confiscation, in Brunswick County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 1/2 acre, to Nathaniel Wooten, for the sum of 6 pounds and 10 shillings, in British money.

Williamson, Private Thomas

Private Thomas Williamson served in the Loyalist, North Carolina Militia. He was involved in a stoppage (injury) in a battle in North Carolina. Private Thomas Williamson, and his fellow injured soldiers, were placed in His Majesty’s Hospital in Wilmington, Brunswick County, North Carolina. They were, in the Wilmington Hospital between the 25th of April in 1781, and the 25th of June in 1781, both days inclusive. Private Thomas Williamson was under the command of Colonel Hector McNeil. He was part of the company, who were in charge of the Refugees from North Carolina and South Carolina. We have no further information of the life, death or military career of Private Thomas Williamson.

Willets, Hope and Buck

Hope and Buck Willets were a Loyalist  couple living in North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution, the individual states started confiscating the Loyalists land. The States, then sold the property to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause. Women were not often listed in any type of document; unless she was single or a person of wealth.

Willets, Hope and Buck

Hope and Buck Willets lost 52 and 1/2 acres of land, to confiscation, in Brunswick County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 52 and 1/2 acres, to Robert Bell, for the sum of 14 pounds and 5 shillings, in British money.

Wood, Private William

Private William Wood served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private William Wood’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no other knowledge about Private William Wood.

Wormley, Captain John

Captain John Wormley was born in America. He volunteered in North Carolina at the age of 22. Captain John Wormley began his military career between 1777 and 1783. We have no additional details about Captain John Wormley’s life, death or military career.

Wright, Colonel Gideon

Colonel Gideon Wright was from North Carolina. He was one of the Refugees sent to Charlestown (now Charleston), South Carolina, by Lieutenant General Lealy or Lieutenant General Leslie on the 28 of May in 1782. Many Refugees were placed in Charlestown, South Carolina. Colonel Gideon Wright was ordered to be paid by Paymaster Colonel Robert Gray. He was stationed in Charleston, South Carolina; and there he and his men were in charge of the Refugees from North Carolina and South Carolina. We have no other details of the life, death or military career of Colonel Gideon Wright.

Wright, Thomas

Thomas Wright was a member of the Loyalist community, in North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina as well as other states started confiscating most of the Loyalist’s land. The states, then sold almost all the land to the Patriots, or those, who fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Thomas Wright lost an unknown amount of land, to confiscation, in Chowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of land, to Edmund Blount, for the sum of 97 pounds in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Thomas Wright lost 1/2 acre of land, to confiscation, in Chowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 1/2 acre, to John Mare, for the sum of 100 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Thomas Wright lost 1/2 acre of land, to confiscation, in Chowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 1/2 acre, to John Mare, for the sum of 150 pounds, in British money.

Yansey, Private Austin

Private Austin Yansey served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Austin Yansey’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no further information about Private Austin Yansey’s life, death or military career.

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