American Revolution Loyalists (Q-T)


Ray, Private Dugald

Private Dugald Ray served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Dugald Ray’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no other knowledge about Private Dugald Ray.

Ray, Colonel Duncan

Colonel Duncan Ray was from Anson County, North Carolina. He was the commanding officer of his unit. Colonel Duncan Ray’s term of service began in 1781 and ended on the 17 of January, 1782. We have no additional details about Colonel Duncan Ray.

Reynolds, Private George

Private George Reynolds served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private George Reynolds’ unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no further information about Private George Reynolds.

Reynolds, Private Thomas

Private Thomas Reynolds served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Thomas Reynolds’ unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no other knowledge about Private Thomas Reynolds.

Rickart, Private Caspar

Private Caspar Rickart served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Caspar Rickart’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no additional details about Private Caspar Rickart.

Riddell, Second Lieutenant Andrew

Second Lieutenant Andrew Riddell served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Second Lieutenant Andrew Riddell’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no other knowledge about Second Lieutenant Andrew Riddell.

Ridghill, Private Mark

Private Mark Ridghill served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Mark Ridghill’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no additional details about Private Mark Ridghill.

Robertson, Mark

Mark Robertson was a member of the Loyalists in North Carolina. He was a landowner. As the American Revolution was coming to an end, the individual states began confiscating Loyalists land. The land was, then sold mostly to the Patriots, or the people, who fought or gave aid for the American Cause. Mark Robertson and Mark Robeson could be the same person.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Mark Robertson lost 304 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 304 acres, to Robert Raiford, for the sum of 60 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Mark Robertson lost 280 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 280 acres, to Robert Raiford, for the sum of 60 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Mark Robertson lost 320 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 320 acres, to Jarrett Ervin, for the sum of 111 pounds and 3 shillings, in British money.

Robeson, Mark

Mark Robeson was a Loyalist from North Carolina. As the American Revolution was coming to and end, the states started confiscating almost all the Loyalist land. The states then, sold the land to the Patriots, or people, who fought or gave aid to the American cause.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Mark Robeson lost 288 acres of land, to confiscation, in  Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 288 acres, to Jarrell Ervin, for the sum of 102 pounds and 4 shillings, in British money.

Robison, Second Lieutenant Charles

Second Lieutenant Charles Robison served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Second Lieutenant Charles Robison’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no further information about Second Lieutenant Charles Robison.

Sappenfield, Mathias

Mathias Sappenfield was a member of the Loyalist’s community, living in North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as the other states, began confiscating, the Loyalist’s lands. The states then, sold the lands to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On November the 5th, of 1787, Mathias Sappenfield lost 216 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 216 acres, to Edward Scarborough, for the sum of 475 pounds, in British money.

On November the 5th, of 1787, Mathias Sappenfield lost 69 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 69 acres, to Edward Scarborough, for then sum of 320 pounds, in British money.

Scarbourgh, Captain Stephen

Captain Stephen Scarbourgh was from Bladden County, North Carolina. He began his military career on May 1, 1781. The commanding officer of his unit was Colonel Hector Mac Neill of the North Carolina Loyalist Militia. He began his service under Colonel Hector Mac Neill on September 17, 1781. We have no additional details about Captain Stephen Scarbourgh.

Shaw, Lieutenant John

Lieutenant John Shaw was born in America. He volunteered in North Carolina at the age of 21. Lieutenant John Shaw began his military career between 1777 and 1783. We have no other knowledge about Lieutenant John Shaw.

Shaw, Private Norman

Private Norman Shaw was from Anson County, North Carolina, and belonged to Anson County Regiment. The commanding officer was Colonel Duncan Ray. His unit was stationed in Charlestown, South Carolina. Private Norman Shaw was a refugee of North Carolina. We have no further information about Private Norman Shaw.

Shouse, Captain Henry

Captain Henry Shouse was from North Carolina. He was a member of the North Carolina Loyalist Militia. Captain Henry Shouse served in the Regiment of Colonel Samuel Bryan. He was stationed in Charlestown (now Charleston), South Carolina. The paymaster of Captain Henry Shouse’s unit was Colonel Robert Gray, in Charlestown, South Carolina. The Regiment assignment was given by Lieutenant General Leslie. We have no other knowledge of the the life or career of Captain Henry Shouse.

Simpson, Private Jeremiah

Private Jeremiah Simpson served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Jeremiah Simpson’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no additional details about Private Jeremiah Simpson.

Simpson, Private John

Private John Simpson served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private John Simpson’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no other knowledge about Private John Simpson.

Simpson, Ensign Robert

Ensign Robert Simpson was born in Ireland. He volunteered in North America at the age of 21. Ensign Robert Simpson began his military career between 1777 and 1783. We have no further information about Ensign Robert Simpson.

Snider, Sergeant Peter

Sergeant Peter Snider served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Sergeant Peter Snider’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no additional details about Sergeant Peter Snider.

Southerland, Daniel

Daniel Southerland was a member of the Loyalists in North Carolina. He was also, a landonwer. At the end of the American Revolution, the individual states confiscated most of the Loyalists land. The states, including North Carolina, then sold most of the land to the Patriots, who fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Daniel Southerland lost 120 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 120 acres, to Jarrett Ervin, for the sum of 101 pounds and 1 shilling, in British money.

Sproul, Andrew

Andrew Sproul was a member of the Loyalist community, in North Carolina. He was also, a landowner. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina as well as the other states confiscated most of the Loyalist’s land. The states, then sold almost all the land to the Patriots, or those, who fought or gave aid for the American cause. We believe, that Andrew Sproul and Andrew Sprourl could be the same person.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Andrew Sproul lost 310 acres of land, to confiscation, in Camden County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 310 acres, to Hardy Murphrey, for the sum of 130 pounds, in British money.

Sprourl, Andrew

Andrew Sprourl was a Loyalist in North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution, most of the Loyalist’s land in North Carolina and the other states was confiscated. Each state, then sold most of the land to the Patriots. The State of North Carolina did the same.

On November the 1st, of 1786, Andrew Sprourl lost 168 acres of land, to confiscation, in Beaufort County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 168 acres, to Richard Blackledge for the sum of 100 pounds, in British money.

Stevenson, Adjutant James

Adjutant James Stevenson was born in Scotland. He volunteered in the North Carolina  Militia at the age of 30. Adjutant James Stevenson began his military career sometime between 1777 and 1783. We have no more knowledge of Adjutant James Stevenson’s life, death, military career or burial.

Stradfort, Captain John

Captain John Stradfort was from the Colony North Carolina. He was a member of the North Carolina Loyalist Militia. Captain John Stradfort was part of one of the units that was in charge of the Refugees from North Carolina and South Carolina. The service with the Refugees was from 1781 through 1782. His company was also bound for Augustine (now St. Augustine) Florida. On October the 6 of 1782, the Loyalist General in charge of the colony of North Carolina; gave the order for the troops to be paid, for three months. This order came from the North Carolina Loyalist Headquarters. Captain John Stradfort was one of many men, who never received pay from the British Army for his service. We have no further information about the life or military career of Captain John Stradfort.

Stewart, Kennee

Kennee Stewart was a member of the North Carolina Loyalists. The Loyalist found, at the end of the American Revolution, that their land was being confiscated. Almost all loyalist land was confiscated by the states that had been colonies. The land was then sold to the Patriots, or people, who fought for, or gave aid to the American cause.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Kennee Stewart lost 50 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 50 acres, for 28 pounds and 3 shillings, in British money.

Sutherlin, Daniel

Daniel Sutherlin was a member of the Loyalist’s community in North Carolina. He was also, a landowner. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as the other states, began confiscating the Loyalist’s lands. The states then sold the lands to the Patriots, or those who, fought and gave aid for the American cause.

On September the 11th, of 1787, Daniel Sutherin lost an unknown amount of land, to confiscation, in New Hanover, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of land, to John Kingsborough, for the sum of 5,050, in British money.

Swarford, Private Thomas

Private Thomas Swarford served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Thomas Swarford’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no further information about Private Thomas Swarford.

Taylor, Major Archibald

Major Archibald Taylor served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. He served under Colonel Samuel Campbell. Major Archibald Taylor’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a field officer and a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no other knowledge about Major Archibald Taylor.

Taylor, Private Gilbert

Private Gilbert Taylor served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Gilbert Taylor’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina.We have no additional details about Private Gilbert Taylor.

Teel, Private Thomas

Private Thomas Teel served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Thomas Teel’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no other knowledge about Private Thomas Teel.

Teer, Sergeant Richard

Sergeant Richard Teer served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Sergeant Richard Teer’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no further information about Sergeant Richard Teer’s life, death or military career.

Temples, Private James

Private James Temples was from North Carolina. He was a Refugee Third Class, who was sent to Charlestown (now Charleston), South Carolina, by Lieutenant General Leslie. Private James Temples became a member of the North Carolina Loyalist Militia, on the 28th of May in 1782. He was stationed in Charlestown, South Carolina. His commanding officer was Lieutenant General Leslie. Private James Temples’ Paymaster was Colonel Robert Gray. We have on additional knowledge of the life, death or military career of Private James Temples.

Terans, Thomas

Thomas Terans was a member of the community of Loyalists; living in North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina along with the other states began confiscating almost all of the Loyalist’s lands. The states, then started selling most of the land to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause. We believe that Thomas Terans and Thomas Torrance could be the same person.

On March the 23rd, of 1785, Thomas Terans lost 220 acres of land, to confiscation, in Dobbs County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 220 acres, to James Armstrong, for the sum of 20 pounds, in British money.

On April the 25th, of 1785,  Thomas Terans lost 130 acres of land, to confiscation, in Dobbs County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 130 acres, to James Armstrong, for the sum of 46 pounds, in British money.

Thomas, Private John

Private John Thomas served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private John Thomas’ unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no additional details about Private John Thomas’s life, death or military career.

Thompson, Private Ralph

Private Ralph Thompson served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Ralph Thompson’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or Carolina. We have no further information about Private Ralph Thompson.

Tootle, Private Enoch

Private Enoch Tootle served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Enoch Tootle’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no additional details about Private Enoch Tootle.

Torrance, Thomas

Thomas Torrance was a member of the community of Loyalists; living in North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as other states, began confiscating most of the Loyalist’s Lands. The states then, started selling almost all the land, to the Patriot, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause. We believe the Thomas Torrance and Thomas Terans could be the same person.

On November the 5th, of 1787, Thomas Torrance lost 200 acres of land, to confiscation, in Dobbs County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 200 acres, to Samuel Chapman, for the sum of 35 pounds and 10 shillings, in British money.

On November the 5th, of 1787, Thomas Torrance lost 200 acres of land, to confiscation, in Dobbs County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 200 acres, to John Gray Blount, for the sum of 26 pounds, in British money.

On November the 5th, of 1787, Thomas Torrance lost 200 acres of land , to confiscation, in Dobbs County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 200 acres, to Samuel Chapman, for the sum of 111 pounds, in British money.

Tryon, Governor

Governor Tryon was a member of the Loyalist’s community, in North Carolina. He was also a landowner. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as other states, began confiscating the Loyalist’s lands. The States, then sold the lands to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Governor Tryon lost 1 acre of land, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 1 acre, to James Williams, for the sum of 83 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Governor Tryon lost 1 acre of land, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 1 acre, to James Williams, for the sum of 36 pounds and 4 shillings, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Governor Tryon lost 1 acre of land, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 1 acre, to James Williams, for the sum of 18 pounds and 4 shillings, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Governor Tryon lost 1 acre of land, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 1 acre, to James Williams, for the sum of 27 pounds and 1 shillings, in British money.

Tryon, William

William Tryon, Esquire was a member of the loyalists of North Carolina. He was also, a landowner. At the end of the American Revolution, the individual states started confiscating almost all of the Loyalists land. The states, then sold most of the property to the Patriots. They were the people, who fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On October the 24th, of 1786, William Tryon, Esquire lost an unknown amount of land, to confiscation, in Duplin County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of land, to William Jones, for the sum of 100 pounds, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786, William Tryon, Esquire lost an unknown amount of land, to confiscation, in Duplin County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of land, to William Jones, for the sum of 118 pounds, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786, William Tryon, Esquire lost an unknown amount of land, to confiscation, in Duplin County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of land, to Curtis Ivey and J. G. McRee, or G. J. McRee for the sum of 113 pounds and 5 shillings, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786, William Tryon, Esquire lost 60 acres of land, to confiscation, in Duplin County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 60 acres, to David Jones, for the sum of 22 pounds and 1 shilling, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786, William Tryon, Esquire lost 555 acres of land, to confiscation, in Duplin County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 555 acres, to Curtis Ivey and J. G. McRee or G. J. McRee, for the sum of 113 pounds and 5 shillings, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786, William Tryon, Esquire lost 585 acres of land, to confiscation, in Duplin County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 585 acres, to Curtis Ivey and J. G. McRee or G. J. McRee, for the sum of 112 pounds, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786, William Tryon, Esquire lost 180 acres of land, to confiscation, in New Hanover County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 180 acres, to David Jones, for the sum of 65 pounds, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786, William Tryon, Esquire lost over 2 acres of land, to confiscation, in New Hanover County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same over 2 acres, to David Jones, for the sum of 345 pounds, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786, William Tryon, Esquire lost over 45 acres of land, to confiscation, in New Hanover County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then, sold the same over 45 acres, to David Jones, for the sum of 345 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, William Tryon, Esquire lost an unknown amount of land, to confiscation, in Brunswick County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold, the same unknown amount of land, to Howell Tatum for the sum of 45 pounds and 5 shillings, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, William Tryon, Esquire lost 492 acres of land, to confiscation, in Brunswick County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 492 acres, to Robert Howe for the sum of 3,080 pounds, in British money.

Turner, Edward

Edward Turner was a member of the Loyalist community, in North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as the other states, began confiscating almost all of the Loyalist’s lands. The states, then sold most of the lands, to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On November the 5th, of 1787, Edward Turner lost 162 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then, sold the same 162 acres, to James Armstrong, for the sum of 125 pounds, in British money.

Turner, Captain Roger

Captain Roger Turner was a member of the North Carolina Loyalist Militia. He served under Colonel Samuel Bryan. Captain Roger Turner and his men were in charge of the Refugees from North Carolina and South Carolina. Their campaign lasted from 1781 through 1782. Colonel Samuel Bryan directed Paymaster Colonel Robert Gray to pay Captain Roger Turner on the 12th day of August in 1782. We have no further information about the life or military career of Captain Roger Turner.

Tuton, Joseph

Joseph Tuton was a member of the Loyalist community, living in North Carolina. He was also, a landowner. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina,as well as the other states,began confiscating almost all of the Loyalist’s lands. The states, then sold most of the lands to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid, for the American cause.

On October the 24th, of 1786, Joseph Tuton lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Edgecombe County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of acres of land, to Richard Blackledge, or Blakledge, for the sum of 33 pounds, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786, Joseph Tuton lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Edgecombe County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of acres of land, to Archibald Thompson, for the sum of 53 pounds, in British money.

Tyer, Thomas

Thomas Tyer was a member of the Loyalist community in North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution, the State of North Carolina, as well as other states started confiscating most of the Loyalists land. The states then, sold almost all of the land to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Thomas Tyer lost 100 acres of land, to confiscation, in Craven County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 100 acres, to James Arants, for the sum of 37 pounds, in British money.

 

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