American Revolution Loyalists


At the start of the American Revolution, many men signed up to serve on both sides. Some men switched sides as the war continued. This section contains the men, who signed up as Loyalist. The Loyalist fought for the British side. We will continue to add additional information, as we can.

Abernathy, Private Adam

Private Adam Abernathy served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Adam Abernathy’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no further information about Private Adam Abernathy.

Airhart, Private Philip

Private Philip Airhart served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Philip Airhart’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no other knowledge about Private Philip Airhart.

Agar, John

John Agar was a member of the community of Loyalists, living in North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as the other states, began confiscating almost all of the Loyalist’s lands. The states, then sold most of the lands, to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On October the 14th, of 1786, John Agar lost an unknown amount of land, to confiscation, in Edgecombe, County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of land, to Edward Hall, for the sum of 40 pounds, in British money.

Agner, John

John Agner was a member of the community of Loyalists, living in North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as the other states, began confiscating almost all of the Loyalist’s lands. The states, then sold most of the lands, to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On March the 25th, of 1786, John Agner lost 1/2 acre of land, to confiscation, in Hertford County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 1/2 acre, to Thomas Brittle, for the sum of 130 pounds, in British money.

On March the 25th, of 1786, John Agner loft 1/2 acre of land, to confiscation, in Hertford County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 1/2 acre, to Hardy Murphrey, for the sum of 30 pounds, in British money.

Anderson, Private James

Private James Anderson served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private James Anderson’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no further information about Private James Anderson’s life, death or military career.

Andrews, Major Samuel

Major Samuel Andrews was a member of the North Carolina Loyalist Militia. He was under the command of Colonel Hector Mac Neill. Major Samuel Andrews Regiment was stationed in Charlestown (now Charleston), South Carolina, ending the week of February the 15th, in 1782. The troops from this unit were in charge of the Refugees from North Carolina and South Carolina, from 1781 through 1782. Many of the men in this company, were members of the same family. We have no other details of the life, death or military career of Major Samuel Andrews.

Arnold, Francis

Francis Arnold was a member of the Loyalist community, in North Carolina. He was also, a landowner. At the end of the American Revolution, the State of North Carolina, as well as other states, began confiscating almost all of the Loyalist’s Lands. The states, then sold the land to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On April the 25th, of 1785, Francis Arnold lost 260 acres of land, to confiscation, Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 260 acres, to John Clendenen , for the sum of 324 pounds, in British money.

Artis, Private Josiah

Private Josiah Artis served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Josiah Artis’ unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no other knowledge about Private Josiah Artis’ life, death or military career.

Ashworth, Captain James

Captain James Ashworth served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Captain James Ashworth’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no additional details about Captain James Ashworth.

Bachon, Anthoney

Anthoney Bachon was a member of the community of Loyalists, living in North Carolina. He was also, a landowner. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina and, as well as the other states began confiscating almost all of the Loyalist’s lands. The states, then sold most of the lands, to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On March 14th, of 1786, Anthoney Bachon lost 460 acres of land, to confiscation, in Edgecombe County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 460 acres, to Edward Hall, for the sum of 784 pounds, in British money.

On March 14th, of 1786, Anthoney Bachon lost 123 acres of land , to confiscation, in Edgecombe County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 123 acres, to Amos Johnston, for the sum of 411 pounds, in British money.

On March 14th, of 1786, Anthoney Bachon lost 78 acres of land, to confiscation, in Edgecombe County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 78 acres, to Solomon Sessoms for the sum of 212 pounds, in British money.

Bailey, Private James

Private James Bailey served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private James Bailey’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no further information about Private James Bailey.

Bailey, Private John

Private John Bailey served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private John Bailey’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no other knowledge about Private John Bailey.

Bailey, Private Thomas Senior

Private Thomas Bailey Senior served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Thomas Bailey Senior’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no additional details about Private Thomas Bailey Senior.

Bailey, Private Thomas Junior

Private Thomas Bailey Junior served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Thomas Bailey Junior’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no other knowledge about Private Thomas Bailey Junior.

On November the 5th, of 1787, Thomas Bailey, Jr., lost 150 acres of land, to confiscation, in Anson County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 150 acres, to Sampson Lanier, for the sum of 30 pounds, in British money.

Ballentine, Second Lieutenant Alexander

Second Lieutenant Alexander Ballentine served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Second Lieutenant Alexander Ballentine’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no further information about Second Lieutenant Alexander Ballentine.

Beam, Private William

Private William Beam was from North Carolina. He was a member of the North Carolina Loyalist Militia. Private William Beam was on Duty on Behalf of the Governor of North Carolina. He was under the command of Colonel David Fanning commencing on the 22nd of November in 1781 and ending on the 5th of July of 1782. Private William Beam and his unit were responsible for the refugees from North Carolina and South Carolina from 1781 through 1782. We have no other knowledge of the life or military career of Private William Beam.

Beaton, Laughlin

Laughlin Beaton was a member of the community of Loyalist, living in North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution, the State of North Carolina, as well as the other states, began confiscating almost all of the Loyalists lands. The states then, sold most of the land to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On November the 5th, of 1787, Laughlin Beaton lost 100 acres of land, to confiscation, in Moore County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then, sold the same 100 acres, to Griffith J. McRee, for the sum of 5 pounds, in British money.

Beleu, Private John

Private John Beleu served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private John Beleu’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no additional details about Private John Beleu.

Bennett, John

John Bennett was a member of the Loyalist community, in North Carolina. At the end of the American revolution, North Carolina, as well as the other states began confiscating almost all of the lands of the Loyalists. The State of North Carolina then, sold most of the land to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On November the 5th, of 1787, John Bennett lost 129 acres of land, to confiscation, in Currituck County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 129 acres, to Griffith Dauge, for the sum of 1,225 pounds, in British money.

Benson, Private Martin

Private Martin Benson served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Martin Benson’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no other knowledge about Private Martin Benson.

Berry, Private Michael

Private Michael Berry served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Michael Berry’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no further information about Private Michael Berry.

Biggs, Lieutenant Caleb

Lieutenant Caleb Biggs was from the Colony of North Carolina. He served in the loyalist North Carolina Militia as of the 6th of October, in 1782. He was bound for Augustine (now St. Augustine) in Florida. Lieutenant Caleb Biggs was on of the men in charge of the refugees from North Carolina and South Carolina. He was one of many men, who never received pay for his service in the British Army, during the American Revolution. We have no other knowledge of the life or military career of Lieutenant Caleb Biggs.

Blew, Douglas

Douglas Blew served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Douglas Blew’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was the piper. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no additional details about Douglas Blew’s life or military career.

Blew, Private John

Private John Blew served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private John Blew’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no further information about Private John Blew’s life or military career.

Boilstone, Private Daniel

Private Daniel Boilstone served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Daniel Boilstone’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no other knowledge about Private Daniel Boilstone.

Boyd, Robert

Robert Boyd was a Loyalist of North Carolina. The Loyalists from North Carolina as well as other states had their property confiscated at the end of the American Revolution. The land was, then sold off, in acres by the states, with the British standard of money, or pounds. The Patriots were permitted to buy the property from each state.

On November the 5th, of 1787, Robert Boyd lost 300 acres of land, to confiscation, in Anson County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 300 acres, to Patrick Boggin, for the sum of 100 pounds, in British money.

On November the 5th, of 1787, Robert Boyd lost 300 acres of land, to confiscation, in Anson County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 300 acres, to Anthony Sharp, for the sum of 213 pounds, in British money.

Bradley, Private Robert – Private Robert Bradley served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Robert Bradley’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no additional details about Private Robert Bradley.

Branson, Captain Eli

Captain Eli Branson was from American. He was attached to a North Carolina Independent Company. Captain Eli Branson was forty years of age in 1781, when the company was formed. His military unit was an Independent Loyalist Company. We have no further information about the life or career of Captain Eli Branson.

Brewer, Private Jacob

Private Jacob Brewer was from North Carolina. He was a member of the North Carolina Loyalist Militia. Private Jacob Brewer’s regiment was under the command of Colonel Samuel Campbell. By order of General Leslie, the regiment was assigned to Charlestown (now Charleston), South Carolina. Private Jacob Brewer’s unit paymaster was Colonel Robert Gray. The regiment was formed in 1782. We have no other knowledge of the life or career of Private Jacob Brewer.

Bridgin, Edward

Edward Bridgin was a member of the Loyalist community, living in North Carolina. He was also, a landowner. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as the other states, began confiscating almost all of the Loyalist’s Lands. The states, then sold most of the lands to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On September the 14th, of 1787, Edward Bridgin lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in New Hanover County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of acres of land, to Peter Bacote, for the sum of 2,100 pounds, in British money.

Brimmage, William

William Brimmage was a member of the Loyalist community in North Carolina. He was also a landowner. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina and the other states, began confiscating almost all the land from the Loyalists. The states, then sold most of the lands to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On March the 14th, of 1786, William Brimmage lost an unknown amount of land, to confiscation, in Nash County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of land, to Wright Stanolee, for the sum of 278 pounds, in British money.

On March the 14th, of 1786, William Brimmage lost an unknown amount of land, to confiscation, in Nash County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of land. to Wright Stanolee, for the sum of 30 pounds, British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, William Brimmage lost an unknown amount of land, to confiscation, in Carteret County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of land, to Nathan Smith, for the sum of 103 pounds, in British money.

Brown, George

George Brown was a member of the Loyalist community, living in North Carolina. He was, also a landowner. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as the other states, began confiscating most of the Loyalist lands. The states, then sold almost all of the  lands to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On March the 14th, of 1786, George Brown lost 673 acres of land, to confiscation, in Nash County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 673 acres, to Dixon Marshal, for the sum of 240 pounds, in British money.

Brown, Thomas

Thomas Brown was a member of the community of Loyalists, living in North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina , as well as the other state, began confiscating the land from the Loyalists. The states, then started selling the confiscated land to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On November the 5th, of 1786, Thomas Brown lost 200 acres of land, to confiscation, in Craven County, North Carolina.  The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 200 acres, to John Davis, for the sum of 135 pounds, in British money.

Browne, Chaplain

Chaplain Browne volunteered in North Carolina. He began his military career between 1777 and ended his career in 1783. Chaplain Browne’s first name is not known. We have no further information about Chaplain Browne.

Bryan, Colonel Samuel

Colonel Samuel Bryan was the leader of a regiment under the command of the Right Honourable Lord and General Charles Cornwallis. He started his service on the 24th day, of June in 1780, and ended his service, on the 5th day, of July in 1782. Colonel Samuel Bryan was a member of the North Carolina Loyalist Militia. He and his men were in charge of the Refugees from North Carolina and South Carolina, from 1781 through 1782. We have no additional details of the life or military career of Colonel Samuel Bryan.

Buchannon, William and Company

William Buchannon and Company were Loyalists, who lived in North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution, many states, including North Carolina confiscated most of the Loyalists land; then the land was sold to the Patriots or people on the American side of the war. We don’t know who the company or business associates of William Buchannon were.

On November the 15th, of 1787, William Buchannon and Company lost 203 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bertie County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 203 acres, to George West, for the sum of 430 pounds, in British money.

Cains, Christopher

Christopher Cains was a Loyalist living in North Carolina. He was also, a landowner. At the end of the American Revolution, the individual states started confiscating almost all of the Loyalist land. The states, then sold most of the property to the Patriots, or those people, who fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Christopher Cains, lost 525 acres of land, to confiscation, in Brunswick County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 525 acres, to James Chairs, for the sum of 1,065 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Christopher Cains, lost 160 acres of land, to confiscation, in Brunswick County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 160 acres, to Lewis Dupree, for the sum of 100 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Christopher Cains, lost 350 acres of land, to confiscation, in Brunswick County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 350 acres, to James Chairs, for the sum of 105 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Christopher Cains, lost 550 acres of land, to confiscation, in Brunswick County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 550 acres, to James Chairs, for the sum of 100 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Christopher Cains, lost 640 acres of land, to confiscation, in Brunswick county, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 640 acres, to James Chairs, for the sum of 1,605 pounds, in British money.

Calvin, Matterine

Matterine Calvin was a member of the Loyalist in North Carolina. He was a landowner. As the American Revolution ended the colonies, became states. The states confiscated almost all of the Loyalist land. The states, then sold the land to the Patriots or people, who fought or gave aid to the American cause.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Matterine Calvin, lost 1/2 acre of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 1/2 acre, to Robert Raiford, for the sum of 6 pounds and 10 shillings, in British money.

Campbell, Lieutenant Alexander

Lieutenant Alexander Campbell was born in Scotland. He volunteered in North Carolina at the age of 25. Lieutenant Alexander Campbell began his military career between 1777 and 1783. We have no other knowledge about Lieutenant Alexander Campbell.

Campbell, Quarter Master Archibald

Quarter Master Archibald Campbell served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Quarter Master Archibald Campbell’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no further information about Quarter Master Archibald Campbell.

Campbell, Ensign Donald

Ensign Donald Campbell was born in Scotland. He volunteered in North Carolina at the age of 27. Ensign Donald Campbell began his military career between 1777 and 1783. We have no other knowledge about Ensign Donald Campbell.

Campbell, Lieutenant Donald

Lieutenant Donald Campbell was born in Scotland. He volunteered in North Carolina at the age of 48. Lieutenant Donald Campbell began his military career between 1777 and 1783. We have no additional details about Lieutenant Donald Campbell.

Campbell, Lieutenant James

Lieutenant James Campbell was born in Scotland. He volunteered in North Carolina at the age of 25. Lieutenant James Campbell began his military career between 1777 and 1738. We have no further information about Lieutenant James Campbell.

Campbell, Second Lieutenant John

Second Lieutenant John Campbell served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Second Lieutenant John Campbell’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no other knowledge about Lieutenant John Campbell.

Campbell, Private John Senior

Private John Campbell Senior served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private John Campbell Senior’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no additional details about Private John Campbell Senior.

Campbell, Captain Samuel

Captain Samuel Campbell served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Captain Samuel Campbell’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no further information about Captain Samuel Campbell.

Campbell, Colonel Samuel

Colonel Samuel Campbell served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. His unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. Colonel Samuel Campbell was a field officer. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no other knowledge about Colonel Samuel Campbell.

Campbell, Lieutenant Samuel

Lieutenant Samuel Campbell served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Lieutenant Samuel Campbell’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no additional details about Lieutenant Samuel Campbell.

Campbell, Ensign William

Ensign William Campbell was born in Scotland. He volunteered in North Carolina. Ensign William Campbell began his military career between 1777 and 1783. We don’t know if this William Campbell is the same William Campbell as the one who lost his land to confiscation. So, we record both as we found them. We have no further information about Ensign William Campbell.

On October the 24th, of 1786, William Campbell lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of acres, to Jarrell Ervin, for the sum of over 2 pounds, in British money.

Carraway, Sergeant James

Sergeant James Carraway served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Sergeant James Carraway’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no other knowledge about Sergeant James Carraway.

Cary, James

James Cary was a member of the Loyalist community, living in North Carolina. He was also, a landowner. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as the other states, began confiscating the Loyalist’s lands. The states, then sold the lands, to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On March the 14th, of 1786, James Cary lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Nash County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of land, to Micajah Thomas, for the sum of 121 pounds, in British money.

Chandler, Captain William

Captain William Chandler was born in America. He volunteered in North Carolina at the age of 25. Captain William Chandler began his military career between 1777 and 1783. We have no further information about Captain William Chandler.

Christie, Thomas

Thomas Christie was a Loyalist living in North Carolina. As the American Revolution was ending the states began to confiscate the land belonging to the Loyalist. Most of the land confiscated was sold to the Patriots or people, who were on the American side of the war.

On October the 24th, of 1786, Thomas Christie, lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then, sold the same unknown amount of acres, to Henry E. Lutterluh, for the sum of 83 pounds, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786, Thomas Christie lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of acres, to Henry E. Lutterluh, for the sum of 80 pounds, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786, Thomas Christie, lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of acres, to William Watson, for the sum of 200 pounds and 3 shillings, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786, Thomas Christie, lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of acres, to Daniel Shaw, for the sum of more than 1 pounds, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786, Thomas Christie, lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of acres, to Jerrell Ervin, for the sum of more then 2 pounds, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786, Thomas Christie, lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of acres, to Jerrell Ervin, for the sum of more than 2 pounds, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786, Thomas Christie, lost 106 acres of land, to confiscation, in Sampson County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 106 acres, to John Wester, for the sum of 40 pounds and 10 shillings, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786, Thomas Christie, lost 461 acres of land, to confiscation, in Sampson County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 461 acres, to James Spiller, for the sum of 203 pounds, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786, Thomas Christie, lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Sampson County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of acres, to James Spiller, for the sum of 91 pounds, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786, Thomas Christie, lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Sampson County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of acres, to Samuel Cates, for the sum of at least 12 pounds, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786, Thomas Christie, lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Sampson County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of acres, to Jams Spiller, for the sum of at least 22 pounds, in British money.

Clark, Mrs.

Mrs. Clark was a member of the Loyalist community of North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as the other states, began confiscating the most of the Loyalist’s land. The states, then sold almost all the land to the Patriots, or those, who fought or gave aid for the American cause. Women were not always listed in documents. Usually only, if they are wealthy or well born.

On October the 24th, of 1786, Mrs. Clark lost an unknown amount of land, to confiscation, in Chowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of land, to Selby Harney, for the sum of 3,200 pounds.

Clark and Weir

Clark and Weir were two gentlemen, who were members of the Loyalist community, in North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as the other states began confiscating almost all of the Loyalist’s Land. The states then, sold most of the land, to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Clark and Weir lost an unknown amount of land, to confiscation, in Chowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of land, to Michael Pain, for the sum of 1,151 pounds and 10 shillings, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Clark and Weir lost 1/2 acre of land, to confiscation, in Chowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 1/2 acre, to Michael Payne, for the sum of 342 Pounds and 10 shillings, in British money.

Clary, Patrick

Patrick Clary was a member of the Loyalist community in North Carolina. He was also, a landowner. At the end of the American Revolution. North Carolina, along with the other states, began confiscating almost all of the Loyalist’s land. The states, then started selling most of the land to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Patrick Clary lost an unknown amount of land, to confiscation, in Craven County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of land, to John Craddock for the sum of 3,975 pounds, in British money.

Cleatherell, James

James Cleatherell was a member of the community of Loyalists, living in North Carolina. He was also, a landowner. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as other states, started confiscating most of the Loyalist’s land. The states, then sold the land, to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On November the 15th, of 1787, James Cleatherell lost 640 acres of land, to confiscation, in Craven County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 640 acres, to Edward Parker, for the sum of 203 pounds, in British money.

Coats, Private Jonathan

Private Jonathan Coats served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Jonathan Coats’ unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no additional details about Private Jonathan Coats.

Coffield, Lieutenant Thomas

Lieutenant Thomas Coffield was born in America. He volunteered in North Carolina at the age of 26. Lieutenant Thomas Coffield began his military career between 1777 and 1783. We have no further information about Lieutenant Thomas Coffield.

Colson, Private John

Private John Colson was from North Carolina. He was a Refugee of the Second Class, who was sent to Charlestown (now Charleston), South Carolina on the 28th of May in 1782. He became a member of the North Carolina Loyalist Militia. Private John Colson was under the command of Lieutenant General Lealy or Lieutenant General Leslie. He was allowed payment, and was paid by Paymaster Colonel Robert Gray. Private John Colson was stationed in Charlestown, South Carolina. He was, then part of the unit that was placed in charge of Refugees from North Carolina and South Carolina. We have no additional details of the life, death or military career of Private John Colson.

Coleson, John

John Coleson could be the same as John Colson in the above information. He was a Loyalist, who lived in the State of North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution most of the Loyalists had their land confiscated. Each state, then sold the land to Patriots or people, who were on the American side of the war.

On November the 5th, of 1787, John Coleson lost 400 acres of land, to confiscation, in Anson County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 400 acres, to William Wood, for the sum of 303 pounds, in British money.

Colvill, John

John Colvill was a member of the Loyalists living in North Carolina. He was a landowner. At the end of the American Revolution, the states started confiscating Loyalist land. The individual states, then sold the land mainly to the Patriots, or the people, who fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On November the 15th, of 1787, John Colvill lost 314 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 314 acres, to Robert Raiford, for the sum of 30 pounds, in British money.

Colvin, John

John Colvin was a member of the Loyalists in North Carolina. He was also, a landowner. At the end of the American Revolution, the states started confiscating most of the Loyalists land. The individual states, then sold the almost all of the land to the Patriots, or the people,who fought or gave aid to the American cause. John Colvin and John Colvill could be the same person.

On November the 15th, of 1787, John Colvin lost 344 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 344 acres, to G. J. McRee and Curtis Ivey, for the sum of 16 pounds, in British money.

Cormack, Private Solomon

Private Solomon Cormack served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Solomon Cormack’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no other knowledge about Private Solomon Cormack.

Cornell, Samuel

Samuel Cornell was a member of the community of Loyalists, in North Carolina. He was also, a landowner. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina and the other states began confiscating almost all of the Loyalist’s land. The states, then sold most of the land to the Patriots, or those, who fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On November the 13th, of 1784, Samuel Cornell lost an unknown amount of land , to confiscation, in Craven County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of land, to Spere Singleton, for the sum of 2,160 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Samuel Cornell lost 136 acres of land, to confiscation, in Carteret County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 136 acres, to Eli West, for the sum of 23 pounds, in British money.

Cotton, James

James Cotton was a member of Loyalist landowners of North Carolina. North Carolina, as many states, had a large amount of Loyalist landowners. James Cotton lost 300 acres of land, to confiscation, in Anson County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 300 acres, to Samuel Younge, for the sum of 57 pounds, in British money.

On April the 23rd, of 1785, James Cotton lost 640 acres of land, to confiscation, in Anson County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 640 acres, to Thomas Gillaspie, for the sum of 105 pounds,and 10 shillings, in British money.

Craven, James

James Craven was a member of the Loyalist’s community, living in North Carolina. He was also, a landowner. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as other states, began confiscating the Loyalist’s lands. The states, then sold the land, to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid, for the American cause.

On October the 24th, of 1786, James Craven lost 320 acres of land, to confiscation, in Tyrell County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 320 acres of land, to James Baker, for the sum of 1,860 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, James Craven lost 320 acres of land, to confiscation, in Tyrell County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 320 acres of land, to James Baker, for the sum of 15 pounds, in British money.

Crocker, Lieutenant David

Lieutenant David Crocker served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Lieutenant David Crocker’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no further information about Lieutenant David Crocker.

Crosby, Private James

Private James Crosby served as a member of the North Carolina Loyalist Militia. He was wounded in a North Carolina battle. Private James Crosby at that time, he was placed in His Majesty’s Hospital at Wilmington, of Brunswick County, North Carolina. He, and his fellow wounded soldiers, were in the hospital, between the 25th of August in 1781, and the 24th of October in 1781, both days inclusive. Private James Crosby was under the command of Colonel Hector McNeill. After he was injured, he received a payment from the from Paymaster Colonel Robert Gray. Private James Crosby, was also, part of the company that was in charge of the Refugees from North Carolina and South Carolina, during a time from 1781 through 1782. We have no additional details of the life, death or military career.

Cunningham, Walter

Walter Cunningham was a Loyalist. He was part of a large number of Loyalist landowners in  North Carolina. As the Revolutionary War came to an end, North Carolina, as well as other states began confiscating, the Loyalist’s land. These states had been British colonies before the war. During this time, Walter Cunningham lost 100 acres of land, to confiscation, in Anson County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 100 acres, to Samuel Younge, for the sum of 57 pounds, in British money.

Walter Cunningham, also lost 200 acres of land, to confiscation, in Anson County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 200 acres, to Benjamin Robenson, for the sum of 61 pounds, in British money.

Currie, Quarter Master Neil

Quarter Master Neil Currie was born in Scotland. He volunteered in North Carolina at the age 25. Quarter Master Neil Currie began his miltary career between 1777 and 1783. We have no other knowledge about Quarter Master Neil Currie.

Curry, Captain Joseph

Captain Joseph Curry was part of a North Carolina Militia Regiment. His regiment was under the command of Colonel David Fanning. Captain Joseph Curry participated in this period of service commenced on the 1st of March in 1781 and ended on the 30th day of September in 1782. This length of time spanned five hundred and forty nine days. Captain Joseph Curry and his troops were in charge of the Refugees from North Carolina and South Carolina from 1781 through 1782. We have no further information of the life or career of Captain Joseph Curry.

Curry, Private Neil

Private Neil Curry served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Neil Curry’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no additional details about Private Neil Curry.

Curtis, Private William

Private William Curtis was from North Carolina. He was a member of the North Carolina Loyalist Militia. Private William Curtis was under the command of Colonel Samuel Campbell. He was stationed for a time in Charlestown (now Charleston), South Carolina. We have no further information of the life or career of Private William Curtis.

Dick, Thomas

Thomas Dick was a member of the community of Loyalists, living in North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution, the State of North Carolina and the other states began confiscating almost all of the Loyalist’s land. The states, then started selling most of the land to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On April the 25th, 1787, Thomas Dick lost 150 acres of land, to confiscation, in Dobbs County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 150 acres, to Richard Caswell, for the sum of 37 pounds, in British money.

Dill, Private Jobb

Private Jobb Dill served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Jobb Dill’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no other knowledge about Private Jobb Dill.

Dixson, Private Aaron

Private Aaron Dixson served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Aaron Dixson’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no additional details about Private Aaron Dixson.

Dobbs, Arthur

Arthur Dobbs was a member of the community of Loyalists; living in North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution, The State of North Carolina, then began confiscating almost all of the Loyalist’s lands. The states, started selling most of the land, to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid, for the American cause.

On November the 5th, 1787, Arthur Dobbs lost 300 acres of land, to confiscation, in Dobbs County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 300 acres, to Richard Caswell, for the sum of 43 pounds, in British money.

Dobbs, Edward Brice

Edward Brice Dobbs was a member of the Loyalist community, in North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution, the State of North Carolina, as well as other states, began confiscating almost all of the Loyalists, lands. The states, then sold most of the land to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On October the 24th, of 1786, Edward Brice Dobbs lost 571 acres of land, to confiscation, in Sampson County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 571 acres, to Curtis Ivey and J. G. McRee, for the sum of 107 pounds, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786, Edward Brice Dobbs lost over 7 acres of land, to confiscation, in Sampson County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same over 7 acres, to Thomas Carr, for the sum of 32 pounds, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786, Edward Brice Dobbs lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Sampson County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of land, to James Moore, for the sum of 16 pounds, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786, Edward Brice Dobbs lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Sampson County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of land, to James Spiller, for the sum of 21 pounds, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786, Edward Brice Dobbs lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Sampson County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of land, to Jonathan Taylor, for the sum of 14 pounds and 6 pennies, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786, Edward Brice Dobbs lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Sampson County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of land, to Jonathan Taylor, for the sum of 80 pounds and 6 shillings, in British money, in Sampson County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of land, to Thomas Carr, for the sum of 32 pounds, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786, Edward Brice Dobbs lost 49 acres of land, to confiscation, in Sampson County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 49 acres, to Jonathan Carr, for the sum of 50 pounds and 1 shilling, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786, Edward Brice Dobbs lost 407 acres of land, to confiscation, in Sampson County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 407 acres, to Curtis Ivey and J. G. McRee, for the sum of 340 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, 1787, Edward Brice Dobbs lost 512 acres of land, to confiscation, in Craven County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 512 acres, to James Arants, for the sum of 141 pounds, in British money.

Dobbs, Francis C.

Francis C. Dobbs was a member of the community of Loyalists in North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution, the State of North Carolina and the other states, began confiscating almost all the Loyalist’s lands. The states, then started selling the land to the Patriots, or those who fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Francis C. Dobbs loast 225 acres of land, to confiscation, in Craven County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 225 acres, to John Gray Blount, for the sum of 15 pounds, in British money.

Doty, Captain Daniel

Captain Daniel Doty was from North Carolina. He was a member of the North Carolina Loyalist Militia. Captain Daniel Doty was station in Charlestown (now Charleston), South Carolina. His commanding officer in Charlestown, South Carolina was Major Ferguson in Charlestown, South Carolina. The Paymaster of Captain Daniel Doty’s unit was Colonel Robert Gray. Lieutenant General Leslie was the officer, who gave the order to Occupy Charlestown, South Carolina. He was assigned to the area of Charlestown, South Carolina on August the 14, of 1782. We have no other information about the life or career of Captain Daniel Doty.

Doud, Conner

Conner Doud  was a member of the community of Loyalists, living in North Carolina. He was also, a landowner. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as the other states, began confiscating the Loyalist’s lands. The states then, sold the lands, to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Conner Doud lost 100 acres of land, to confiscation, in Moore County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 100 acres, to G. J. McRee and Curtis Ivey, for the sum of 10 pounds, in British money.

Downer, Private Moses

Private Moses Downer served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Moses Downer’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no other knowledge about Private Moses Downer.

Downie, Private Donald

Private Donald Downie served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Donald Downie’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no further information about Private Donald Downie.

Duckenfield, Nathaniel

Nathaniel Duckenfield was a Loyalist, who lived in North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution, each of the states confiscated land from the Loyalists or those people loyal to the British, during the war. The land was, then sold to Patriots or those loyal to the United States.

On November the 5th, of 1787, Nathaniel Duckenfield lost 462 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bertie County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 462 acres, to Jonathan Jacocks, for the sum of 332 pounds in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Nathaniel Duckenfield lost 333 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bertie County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 333 acres, to Simon Totevine, for the sum of 3,335 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Nathaniel Duckenfield lost 475 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bertie County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 475 acres, to William Asburn (We believe this entry to be the same as William Ashburn), for the sum of 1,805 pounds and 5 shillings, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Nathaniel Duckenfield lost 400 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bertie County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 400 acres, to Humphrey Hardy, for the sum of 329 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Nathaniel Duckenfield lost 213 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bertie County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 213 acres, to William Ashburn, for the sum of 515 poundsand 10 shillings, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Nathaniel Duckenfield lost 425 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bertie County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 425 acres, to George Ryan, for the sum of 5,802 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Nathaniel Duckenfield lost 225 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bertie County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 225 acres, to Thomas W. Pugh, for the sum of 75 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Nathaniel Duckenfield lost 640 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bertie County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 640 acres, to George Ryan, for the sum of 766 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Nathaniel Duckenfield lost 579 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bertie County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 579 acres, to Jeremiah Fleetwood, for the sum of 426 pounds and 10 shillings, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Nathaniel Duckenfield lost 425 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bertie County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 425 acres, to John Capeheart, for the sum of 310 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Nathaniel Duckenfield lost 193 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bertie County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 193 acres, to Christopher Clark, for the sum of 1,120 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Nathaniel Duckenfield lost 225 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bertie County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 225 acres, to William Ashburn, for the sum of 104 pounds and 5 shillings, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Nathaniel Duckenfield lost 290 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bertie County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 290 acres, to John Hagan, for the sum of 123 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Nathaniel Duckenfield lost 280 acres of land, to confiscaiton, in Bertie County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 280 acres, to Humphrey Hardy, for the sum of 101 pounds and 10 shillings, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Nathaniel Duckenfield lost 374 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bertie County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 374 acres, to George Ryan, for the sum of 4,953 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Nathaniel Duckenfield lost 550 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bertie County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 550 acres, to George Ryan, for the sum of 9,191 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Nathaniel Duckenfield lost 235 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bertie County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 235 acres, to Jonathan Jacocks, for the sum of 1,620 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Nathaniel Duckenfield lost 518 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bertie County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 518 acres, to Elisha Ashburn, for the sum of 5,053 pounds and 15 shillings, in British money.

Duncan, Private Dugald

Private Dugald Duncan served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Dugald Duncan’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no additional details about Private Dugald Duncan’s life or military career.

Dunavan, Private Matthew

Private Matthew Dunavan was a member of the Independent Loyalist North Carolina Dragoons. He was part of the North Carolina Loyalists. Private Matthew Dunavan and a number of his fellow Dragoons, were wounded in battle. They were placed in His Majesty’s Hospital in Charlestown, (now Charleston), South Carolina. Private Matthew Dunavan and his fellow Dragoons, who were wounded, received payment for their injuries. They were in the Hospital between, October the 21st of 1781, and October 24 of 1781, both days inclusive. The men from Private Matthew Dunavan’s company were in charge of the Refugees from North Carolina and South Carolina, from 1781 through 1782. We have no further information of the life, death or military career, of Private Matthew Dunavan.

Eborn and Reynolds were members of the Loyalist community in North Carolina. They were also, land owners. At the end of the American Revolution, the State of North Carolina and other states confiscated almost all the Loyalist land. The states, then sold the land, to the Patriots, or those, who fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On November the 15th, of 1787, the two gentlemen, Eborn and Reynolds lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Brunswick County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of land, to William Gause, for the sum of 13 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, the two gentlemen, Eborn and Reynolds lost 1/2 acre of land, to confiscation, in Brunswick County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 1/2 acre, to Benjamin Mills, for the sum of 10 pounds, in British money.

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