American Revolution Loyalists (E-H)


Edwards, Captain Meredith

Captain Meredith Edwards served in the Loyalist Colonial Militia of North Carolina. His commanding officer was Colonel David Fanning. His regiment began their service commencing on the 16th of July, in 1781 and ending on the 5th of July, in 1782. Captain Meredith Edwards’ regiment was in charge of the Refugees from North Carolina and South Carolina. We have no other knowledge of the life, or military career, of Captain Meredith Edwards.

Evans, Private Samuel

Private Samuel Evans served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Samuel Evans’ unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North Carolina or South Carolina. We have no further information about Private Samuel Evans.

Evans, Second Captain Thomas

Second Captain Thomas Evans served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Second Captain Thomas Evans’ unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no additional details about Second Captain Thomas Evans.

Faircloth, Sergeant Zachariah

Sergeant Zachariah Faircloth served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Sergeant Zachariah Faircloth’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no further information about Sergeant Zachariah Faircloth.

Falkinburgh, Second Lieutenant Isaac

Second Lieutenant Isaac Falkinburgh served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Second Lieutenant Isaac Falkinburgh’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no other knowledge about Second Lieutenant Isaac Falkinburgh.

Fanning, Edmund

Edmund Fanning was a member of the community of Loyalists, living in North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as the other states, began confiscating most of the Loyalist’s lands. The States, then sold almost all of the lands, to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Edmund Fanning lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of acres of land, to Roswell Huntington, for the sum of 501 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Edmund Fanning lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of acres of land, to Memucan Hunt, for the sum of 1,001 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Edmund Fanning lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of acres of land, to William Lytle, for the sum of 1,022 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Edmund Fanning lost 1 acre of land, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 1 acre, to Josiah Watts, for the sum of 726 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Edmund Fanning lost 1 acre of land, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 1 acre, to William Waters, for the sum of 535 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Edmund Fanning lost 1 acre of land, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 1 acre, to William Sheppard, for the sum of 550 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Edmund Fanning lost 1 acre of land, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 1 acre, to George Daugherty, for the sum of 601 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Edmund Fanning lost 1 acre of land, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 1 acre, to William Sheppard, for the sum of 405 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Edmund Fanning lost 3/4 of an acre of land, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 3/4 of an acre, to George Daugherty, for the sum of 835 pounds, in British money.

Fereby, Private John

Private John Fereby served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private John Fereby’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no further information about Private John Fereby.

Foderington, Lieutenant Alexander

Lieutenant Alexander Foderington was born in America. He volunteered in North Carolina at the age of 23. Lieutenant Alexander Foderington began his military career between 1777 and 1783. We have no further information about Lieutenant Alexander Foderington.

Folling, Private Edmund

Private Edmund Folling served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Edmund Folling’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no additional details of Private Edmund Folling’s life, death, burial or military career.

Forbes, William

William Forbes was a member of the Loyalist’s community, of North Carolina. He was also, a landowner. At the end of the American Revolution, the State of North Carolina,as well as the other states began confiscating almost all of the Loyalist’s lands. The states then, sold most of the lands, to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On October 24th, of 1786, William Forbes lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Sampson County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of acres of land, to Hardy Homes, for the sum of 150 pounds, in British money.

Fur, Richard

Richard Fur was a member of the community of Loyalists, in North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution, the State of North Carolina, as well as the other states, began confiscating most of the Loyalist’s lands. The states then, sold almost all, of the same land to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On November the 5th, of 1787, Richard Fur lost 100 acres of land, to confiscation, in Craven County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 100 acres, to William Griffith, for the sum of 51 pounds, in British money.

Gates, Private Robert

Private Robert Gates served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Robert Gates’ unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no other knowledge about Private Robert Gates.

Gibson, Surgeon John

Surgeon John Gibson served in the North Carolina Royal Militia. His commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Surgeon John Gibson and his unit were stationed on James Island. They were on James Island for the duration of the American Revolution. Surgeon John Gibson was responsible for the care of the refugees as well as his own unit. We have no additional information of the life death, or military career of Surgeon John Gibson.

Godfrey, Private John

Private John Godfrey was a member of the North Carolina Loyalist Independent Dragoons. He was wounded in battle. Private John Godfrey and other men in the Dragoons were placed in His Majesty’s Hospital at Charlestown (now Charleston), South Carolina. He and the other stoppages (injured), were at the hospital, between the 25th of October in 1781, through the 24th of December in 1781, both days inclusive. We have no other details about the life, death or military career of Private John Godfrey.

Godwin, Alexander

Alexander Godwin was a member of the Loyalist community, living in North Carolina. He was also, a landowner. At the end of the American Revolution, the State of North Carolina, along with the other states, began confiscating almost all of the loyalists lands. The states, then sold the lands to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On October the 24th, of 1786, Alexander Godwin lost 225 acres of land, to confiscation, in Edgecombe County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 225 acres, to Andrew Greer, for the sum of 199 pounds, in British money.

Godwin, David

David Godwin was a member of the Loyalists, during the American Revolution. He lived in North Carolina. At the end of the war, the Loyalists had their land confiscated, by the individual states. North Carolina confiscated the land of the Loyalists, then sold it, to the Patriots or people on the American side of the war.

On November the 15th, of 1787, David Godwin, lost 239 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 239 acres, to Jacob Rhodes, for the sum of 315 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, David Godwin, lost 88 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 88 acres, to Jacob Rhodes, for the sum of 121 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, David Godwin, lost 50 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 50 acres, to Alexander Goddin, for the sum of 50 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, David Godwin, lost 51 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 51 acres, to Curtis Ivey and G. J. McRee, for the sum of 10 pounds and 10 shillings, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, David Godwin, lost 577 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 577 acres, to John Yates, for the sum of 221 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, David Godwin, lost 100 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 100 acres, to John McMillan, for the sum of 6 pounds and 1 shilling, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, David Godwin, lost 100 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 100 acres, to Mathew R. White, for the sum of 14 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, David Godwin, lost 50 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the sme 50 acres, to Richard Brown, for the sum of 12 pounds and 10 shillings, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, David Godwin, lost 118 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 118 acres, to Alexander Goddin, for the sum of 50 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, David Godwin, lost 100 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 100 acres, to Jacob Reads, for the sum of 12 pounds and 13 shillings, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, David Godwin, lost 87 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 87 acres, to G. J. McRee and Curtis Ivey, for the sum of 57 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, David Godwin, lost 130 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 130 acres to G. J. McRee and Curtis Ivey, for the sum of 72 pounds, in British money.

Graham, Lieutenant Colonel

Lieutenant Colonel Graham served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. He served under Colonel Samuel Campbell. Lieutenant Colonel Graham’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a field officer. Lieutenant Colonel Graham’s first name is not known. He was a refugee of North Carolina or South Carolina. We have no further information about Lieutenant Colonel Graham.

Graham, Colonel Faith

Colonel Faith Graham and his Regiment served under a few different commanders. He was from North Carolina. Colonel Faith Graham and his soldiers were stationed in Charlestown (now Charleston), South Carolina. They were in Charlestown, South Carolina by December the first of 1781. Colonel Faith Graham and his men were responsible for the refugees from North Carolina and South Carolina. His command of this unit lasted from 1781 to 1782. We have no additional information of Colonel Faith Graham’s life or Career.

Gray, Colonel Robert

Colonel Robert Gray was the postmaster for the militia. He was from Bladen County, North Carolina. Colonel Robert Gray was a member of the Bladen County, North Carolina, Loyalist Militia. He was in charge of the payroll for the Troops of the Bladen County, North Carolina, Loyalist Militia. His unit was stationed in Charlestown (now Charleston), South Carolina. Colonel Robert Gray was at his post from 1781 through 1782.

Grayham, Faithful

Faithful Grayham was a member of the Loyalists living in North Carolina. He was a land owner. As the American Revolution was ending, the states began confiscating the land belonging to the Loyalists. North Carolina, along with the other states sold the land to the Patriots, or people, who fought or gave aid to the American cause.

On November the 15th, 1787, Faithful Grayham lost 640 acres of land, to confiscation,in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 640 acres, to Griffith J. McRee, for the sum of 2,505 pounds, in British money.

Gregg, Frederick

Frederick Gregg was a member of the community of Loyalists; living in North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution, the State of North Carolina, as well as the other states, began confiscating most of the Loyalist’s Lands. The states, then sold almost all of the lands to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On October the 24th, of 1786, Frederick Gregg lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Duplin County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of land, to Joseph T. Roads, for the sum of 115 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Frederick Gregg lost 400 acres of land, to confiscation, in Moore County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 400 acres, to Griffith J. McRee, for the sum of 40 pounds, in British money.

Grigg, Frederick

Frederick Grigg was a member of the community of Loyalists; living in North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution, the State of North Carolina, as well as the other states, began confiscating most of the Loyalist’s Lands. The states, then sold almost all of the lands to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause. We believe that Frederick Grigg and Frederick Gregg could be the same person.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Frederick Grigg lost 100 acres of land, to confiscation, in Moore County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 100 acres, to G. J. McRee and Curtis Ivey, for the sum of 13 pounds, in British money.

Greenlie, James

James Greenie was a member of the Loyalist community, living in North Carolina. He was also, a landowner. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina and the other states, began confiscating the Loyalist’s lands. The states, then sold the lands to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On March the 14th, of 1786, James Greenlie lost 750 acres of land, to confiscation, in Nash County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 750 acres, to Dixon Marshal, for the sum of 150 pounds, in British money.

Hall, Private Richard

Private Richard Hall served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Richard Hall’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no additional details about Private Richard Hall.

Hambleton, John

John Hambleton was a member of the Loyalist community; and living in North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as the other states began confiscating almost all of the Loyalist’s lands. The states, then started selling most of the same lands to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On December the 14th, of 1785, John Hambleton lost 371 acres of land, to confiscation, in Dobbs County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 371 acres, to James Glasgow, for the sum of 69 pounds, in British money.

On March the 14th, of 1786, John Hambleton lost 275 acres of land, to confiscation, in Halifax County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 275 acres, to James Casthstarphen, for the sum of 105 pounds, in British money.

Hamilton, Lieutenant James

Lieutenant James Hamilton was born in Scotland. He volunteered in North Carolina at the age of 25. Lieutenant James Hamilton began his military career between 1777 and 1783. We have no other knowledge about Lieutenant James Hamilton.

Hamilton, Lieutenant Colonel John

Lieutenant Colonel John Hamilton was born in Scotland. He volunteered in North Carolina at the age of 36. Lieutenant Colonel John Hamilton began his military career between 1777 and 1783. We have no further information about Lieutenant Colonel John Hamilton.

Hamilton, Ensign Robert

Ensign Robert Hamilton was born in Scotland. He volunteered in North Carolina at the age of 26. Ensign Robert Hamilton began his military career between 1777 and 1783. We have no other knowledge about Ensign Robert Hamilton.

Hamilton, Ensign Roderick

Ensign Roderick Hamilton was born in Scotland. He volunteered in North Carolina at the age of 36. Ensign Roderick Hamilton began his military career between 1777 and 1783. We have no additional details about Ensign Roderick Hamilton.

Hamilton, Captain Thomas

Captain Thomas Hamilton was born in Scotland. He volunteered in North Carolina at the age of 25. Captain Thomas Hamilton began his military career between 1777 and 1783. We have no other knowledge about Captain Thomas Hamilton.

Hamilton, Captain William

Captain William Hamilton was born in Scotland. He volunteered in North Carolina at the age of 27. Captain William Hamilton began his military career between 1777 and 1783. We have no additional details about Captain William Hamilton.

Harmon, Private David

Private David Harmon served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private David Harmon’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no other knowledge about Private David Harmon.

Harrison, George

George Harrison was a member of the Loyalist community of North Carolina. He was also, a landowner. At the end of the American Revolution, the individual states began confiscating almost all the Loyalist’s land. The states, then sold most of the land to the Patriots, or those people, who fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On November the 15th, of 1787, George Harrison lost 50 acres of land, to confiscation, in Carteret County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 50 acres, to William Dennis, for the sum of 1 pound and 14 shillings, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, George Harrison lost 27 acres of land, to confiscation, in Carteret County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 27 acres, to Eli West, for the sum of 1 pound and 10 shillings, in British money.

Hartley and Nicholson were two gentlemen, or partners, and members of the loyalist community, living in North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as the other states, began confiscating the Loyalist’s lands. The States, then sold the land to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On March the 25th, of 1786, Hartley and Nicholson lost 640 acres of land, to confiscation, in Hertford County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 640 acres, to Josiah Collings or Collins Jr., for the sum of 1,360 pounds, in British money.

On March the 25th, of 1786, Hartley and Nicholson lost 102 acres of land, to confiscation, in Hertford County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 102 acres, to Josiah Collins, Jr., for the sum of 405 pounds, in British money.

Hately, Private Henry

Private Henry Hately served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Henry Hately’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no additional details about Private Henry Hately.

Hegar, Private Fredrick

Private Fredrick Hegar served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Fredrick Hegar’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no further information about Private Fredrick Hegar’s life, death or military career.

Hendry, Captain Robert

Captain Robert Hendry was returned, to a time, of service after Refugee Status. He and other men were, then under the command of different officers. Captain Robert Hendry and other soldiers were stationed in Charlestown (now Charleston), South Carolina, as of the 1 of December in 1781. These men were put in charge of some of the Refugees from North Carolina and South Carolina from 1781 through 1782. Many family members were in this company. We have no other knowledge of the life, death or military career of Captain Robert Hendry.

Henley, John

John Henley was a member of the community of Loyalists of North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as the other states, began confiscating most of the Loyalist’s land. The states, then sold almost all of the land to the Patriots, or those, who fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On November the 15th, of 1787, John Henley lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Chowan County, North Carolina. The State, then sold the same unknown amount of acres of land, to William Little John, for the sum of 353 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, John Henley lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Chowan, North Carolina. The State, then sold the same unknown amount of acres of land, to Frederick Rampkey, for the sum of 425 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, John Henley lost an unknown amount of acres, of land, to confiscation, in Chowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of acres of land, to Frederick Rampkey, for the sum of 205 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, John Henley lost 118 acres of land, to confiscation, in Chowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 118 acres, to William Roberts, for the sum of 850 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, John Henley lost 1/2 acre of land, to confiscation, in Chowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 1/2 acre, to William Barrett, for the sum of 342 pounds, in British money.

Hill, James

James Hill was a member of the Loyalist community, living in North Carolina. He was also, a landowner. At the end od the American Revolution, North Carolina and the other states began confiscating almost all of the Loyalist’s lands. The states, then sold most of the same land to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause. James Hill may have been James McClelen.

On October the 24th, of 1786, James Hill lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Edgecombe County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of land, to Jonathan Loomas, for the sum of 325 pounds, in British money.

Holiman, Private Gerry

Private Gerry Holiman was a member of the Independent Dragoons to His Majesty’s Royal Troops. This company was attached to the North Carolina Loyalists. He was wounded in battle. Private Gerry Holiman was involved in a stoppage (or injury). He was, then, placed in His Majesty’s Hospital at Charlestown (now Charleston), South Carolina. some of the men of this unit, were in the hospital, between the 25th of December, in 1782 and the 24th of February, in 1782, both days inclusive. The men who were wounded received payment for their injuries. Private Gerry Holiman and the men in this company, were also part of the group, in charge of the Refugees, from North Carolina and South Carolina. We have no additional details of the life, death or military career of Private Gerry Holiman.

Honey

Honey was a person, and probably a man. We don’t have his first name. He was a member of the Loyalist community, in North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina and the other states, started confiscating most of the Loyalist’s land. The states, then sold almost all the land to the Patriots, or those, who fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Honey lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Chowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the unknown amount of acres, to John Pouns for the sum of 460 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Honey lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Chawan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the unknown amount of acres, to John Pouns for the sum of 380 pounds, in British money.

Hooker, John

John Hooker was a member of the Loyalist’s community, living in North Carolina. He was also, a landowner. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as the other states, began confiscating most of the Loyalist’s lands. The states then, sold almost all of the lands, to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On October the 24th, of 1786, John Hooker lost 161 acres of land, to confiscation, in Tyrell County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 161 acres of land, to Nathan Hooker, for the sum of 961 pounds, in British money. John Hooker and Nathan Hooker may have been related. Nathan Hooker may have purchased the land to keep it in the family.

Hooper, Thomas

Thomas Hooper was a member of the Loyalists of North Carolina. He was also, a landowner. As the American Revolution was ending, the individual states started confiscating most of the land owned by the Loyalists. The states, then sold almost all the land to the Patriots, or people, who fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Thomas Hooper lost 591 acres of land, to confiscation, in Brunswick County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 591 acres, to John McKinsey, for the sum of 848 pounds and 10 shillings, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Thomas Hooper lost 391 acres of land, to confiscation, in Brunswick County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 391 acres, to John McKinsey, for the sum of 500 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Thomas Hooper lost 353 acres of land, to confiscation, in Brunswick County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 353 acres, to John McKinsey, for the sum of 570 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Thomas Hooper lost 268 acres of land, to confiscation, in Brunswick County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 268 acres, to John McKinsey, for the sum of 390 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Thomas Hooper lost 429 acres of land, to confiscation, in Brunswick County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 429 acres, to John McKinsey, for the sum of 500 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Thomas Hooper lost 448 acres of land, to confiscation, in Brunswick County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 448 acres, to John McKinsey, for the sum of 500 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Thomas Hooper lost 625 acres of land, to confiscation, in Brunswick County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 625 acres, to John McKinsey, for the sum of 570 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Thomas Hooper lost 225 acres of land, to confiscation, in Brunswick County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 225 acres, to John Mckinsey, for the sum of 848 pounds and 10 shillings, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Thomas Hooper lost 300 acres of land, to confiscation, in Brunswick County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then, sold the same 300 acres, to Griffith John McRee, for the sum of 424 pounds, in British money.

Howard, Martin

Martin Howard was a member of the Loyalist community, living in North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as the other states, started confiscating most of the Loyalist’s lands. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same land, to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On October the 21st, of 1786, Martin Howard lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Craven County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of acres of land, to Elizabeth Cook ( a woman was not permitted to buy land unless she was single or wealthy, for the sum of 1,100 pounds, in British pounds.

Hunt, Private Mattison

Private Mattison Hunt served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Mattison Hunt’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no other knowledge about Private Mattison Hunt.

 

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