American Revolution Loyalists (I-L)


Innis, Private Donald

Private Donald Innis was a member of the North Carolina Loyalist Militia. He was from Anson County, North Carolina. Private Donald Innis, also was part of the unit, that participated in the evacuation of Wilmingtown (now Wilmington), North Carolina in 1782. He was stationed in Charlestown (now Charleston), South Carolina for much of his service. Private Donald Innis, then enlisted in Governor Martin’s Corps. They who were stationed in Charlestown, South Carolina, by Order of General Leslie. Private Donald Innis was under the command of Colonel Robert Gray, while serving in Charlestown, South Carolina. We have on other information of the life or career of Private Donald Innis.

Johnston, Private Arthur

Private Arthur Johnston served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Arthur Johnston’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no additional details about Private Arthur Johnston.

Johnston, Private Edward

Private Edward Johnston was from North Carolina. He served in the North Carolina Loyalist Militia. Private Edward Johnston was a soldier under the command of Lieutenant General Leslie. He was transferred to Charleston (now Charleston), South Carolina in 1782, who ordered that he be paid by Paymaster Colonel Robert Gray. We have no other details of the life, death or military career.

Jones, Private Simon

Private Simon Jones served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Simon Jones’ unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no further information about Private Simon Jones.

Justice, Private John

Private John Justice served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private John Justice’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no other knowledge about Private John Justice.

Keener, Private Martin

Private Martin Keener served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Martin Keener’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no additional details about Private Martin Keener.

Kersey, Jacob

Jacob Kersey was a member of the Loyalists of North Carolina. He was a land owner. At the end of the American Revolution, each individual state confiscated the land owned by the Loyalists. The land was, then sold to the Patriots, or people, who fought or gave aid to the American cause.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Jacob Kersey lost 150 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 150 acres, to Elias Barnes, for the sum of 87 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Jacob Kersey lost 180 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 180 acres, to G. J. McRee, for the sum of 160 pounds and 5 shillings, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Jacob Kersey lost 100 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 100 acres, to G. J. McRee and Curtis Ivey, for the sum of 40 pounds and 10 shillings, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Jacob Kersey lost 290 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 290 acres, to G. J. McRee and Curtis Ivey, for the sum of 220 pounds and 10 shillings, in British money.

Key, Private Robert

Private Robert Key served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Robert Key’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no other knowledge about Private Robert Key’s life, death or military career.

Killion, Private Michael

Private Michael Killion was a member of the North Carolina Loyalist Militia. His commanding officer was Colonel Field. Private Michael Killion suffered a stoppage (or injury) in a battle in North Carolina. He and other men from his company, who were wounded in battle were transferred to His Majesty’s Hospital at Wilmington, Brunswick County, North Carolina. They were in the hospital, between the 24 of June in 1781, and the 24th of August in 1781, both days inclusive. Private Michael Killion and the other injured men were paid, after they were injured. He, and the other men in his company, were part of the detail, in charge of the Refugees, from North Carolina and South Carolina, from 1781 through 1782. We have no other details of the life, death or military career of Private Michael Killion.

Landies, Private John

Private John Landies served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private John Landies’ unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no further information about Private John Landies’ life, death or military career.

Lane, Captain William

Captain William Lane served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Captain William Lane’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no additional details about Captain William Lane.

Langford, Sergeant James

Sergeant James Langford served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Sergeant James Langford’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no further information about Sergeant James Langford.

Larey, Curnelius

Curnelius Larey was a member of the community of Loyalists, living in North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution, the State of North Carolina, as well as the other states, began confiscating, almost all of the Loyalist’s land.  The states, then sold most of the land to the Patriots, who fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On November the 5th, of 1787, Curnelius Larey lost 300 acres of land, to confiscation, in Dobbs County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 300 acres, to Richard Caswell, for the sum of 100 pounds, in British money.

Legget, Captain John

Captain John Legget was born in America. He volunteered in North Carolina at the age of 40. Captain John Legget began his military career between 1777 and 1783. We have no other knowledge about Captain John Legget.

Leggett, Daniel

Daniel Leggett was a member of the Loyalists before the American Revolution. He was living in North Carolina. At the end of the Revolutionary War, the State of North Carolina, as well as other states confiscated almost all of the Loyalist’s land. The land was, then sold to the Patriots or people, who were on the American side during the war.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Daniel Leggett lost 100 acres of land, to confiscation, Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 100 acres, to Jacob Rhodes, for the sum of 10 pounds and 5 shillings, in British money.

Leggett, David

David Leggett was a member of the Loyalists before the American Revolution. He was living in the State of North Carolina. At the end of the Revolutionary War, North Carolina as well as other states confiscated almost all of the land of the Loyalists. The land was, then sold to the Patriots or people, who were on the American side, during the war.

On November the 15th, of 1787, David Leggett lost 150 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 150 acres, to Jacob Rhodes, for the sum of 22 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, David Leggett lost 77 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 77 acres, to Robert Raiford, for the sum of 20 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, David Leggett lost 100 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 100 acres, to Mathew R. White, for the sum of 15 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, David Leggett lost 143 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 143 acres, to Peter Smith, for the sum of 14 pounds and 10 shillings, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, David Leggett lost 117 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 117 acres, to David Flowers, for the sum of 12 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, David Leggett lost 243 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 243 acres, to Curtis Ivey and G. J. McRee, for the sum of 40 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, David Leggett lost 100 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carloina, then sold the same 100 acres, to James White, for the sum of 20 pounds, in British money.

Leppo, Private Isaac

Private Isaac Leppo served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Isaac Leppo’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no additional details about Private Isaac Leppo.

Lifener, Private George

Private George Lifener served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Miltiia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private George Lifener’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no further information about Private George Lifener.

Little, Andrew

Andrew Little was a community of Loyalists, living in North Carolina. He was also, a landowner. At the end of the American Revolution, the State of North Carolina, then began confiscating almost all of the Loyalist’s lands. The states, then sold the lands to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On October the 24th, 1786, Andrew Little lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Edgecombe County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of acres of land, to Richard Blakledge, for the sum of 76 pounds, in British money.

On October the 24th, 1786, Andrew Little lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Edgecombe County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of acres of land, to Richard Blackledge or Blakledge, for the sum of more than 7 pounds, in British money.

Lother, William

William Lother was a Loyalist living in North Carolina at the beginning of the American Revolution. The almost all of the Loyalists of North Carolina and other states had their land confiscated by their individual states. The land, was then sold, mainly, to the Patriots of the American Revolution. We know nothing else of the life, death or burial of William Lother.

On November the 15th, of 1787 William Lother lost 100 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bertie County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 100 acres, to George Ryan, for the sum of 451 pounds, in British money.

Low, William

William Low was a member of the Loyalist community in North Carolina. He was also a landowner. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as the other states, started confiscating almost all the Loyalist’s land. The states, then sold the land to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On November the 15th, of 1787, William Low lost 276 acres of land, to confiscation, in Carteret County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 276 acres, to William Dennis, for the sum of 100 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, William Low lost 200 acres of land to confiscation, in Carteret County. North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 200 acres, to William Dennis, for the sum of 31 pounds, in British money.

Lowther, William

William Lowther was a member of a community of Loyalists, living in North Carolina. He was also, a landowner. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as the other states, began confiscating the lands of the Loyalists. The states, then sold the land to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause. We believe, that William Lowther and Willaim Lother could be the same person.

On October the 24th, of 1786, William Lowther lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Edgecombe County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of land, to John Gray Blount, for the sum of 580 pounds, in British money.

Lowry, Second Captain Lewis

Second Captain Lewis Lowry served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Second Captain Lewis Lowry’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no other knowledge about Second Captain Lewis Lowry.

 

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