American Revolution Loyalists (M-P)


Mackie, Robert

Robert Mackie was a member of the community of Loyalists, Living in North Carolina. He was also, a landowner. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as other states, began confiscating most of the Loyalist’s lands. The states, then sold almost all of the lands to the Patriots, or those,who fought or gave aid for the American cause. Robert Mackie could, also be Robert MacKie.

On October the 24th, of 1786, Robert Mackie lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Edgecombe County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina,then sold the same unknown amount of acres of land, to John Ingles, for the sum of 252 pounds, in British money.

MacLeod, Private Murdoch

Private Murdoch MacLeod served as a volunteer in the North Carolina Militia. He then, enlisted in the North Carolina Highland Regiment. Private Murdoch MacLeod was from Anson County, North Carolina. He and his unit were stationed in North Carolina and South Carolina for the duration of the American Revolution. His responsibilities included the care and containment of the refugees form North Carolina and South Carolina. We have no additional details of the life or career of Private Murdoch MacLeod.

Manson, Major Daniel

Major Daniel Manson was born in Scotland. He volunteered in North Carolina at the age of 44. Major Daniel Manson began his military career between 1777 and 1783. We have no additional details about Major Daniel Manson.

Manson, Ensign Thomas

Ensign Thomas Manson was born in Scotland. He volunteered in North Carolina at the age of 24. Ensign Thomas Manson began his military career between 1777 and 1783. We have no further information about Ensign Thomas Manson.

Martin, Captain John

Captain John Martin was born in Scotland. He volunteered in North Carolina at the age of 56. Captain John Martin began his military career between 1777 and 1783. We have no other knowledge about Captain John Martin.

Martin, Josiah

Josiah Martin was a member of the Loyalist community, living in North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as the other states, began confiscating most of the Loyalist’s land. The states, then sold the land to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On November the 5th, of 1787, Josiah Martin lost 160 acres of land, to confiscation, in Montgomery County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 160 acres, to Alexander Frazer, for the sum of 31 pounds and 15 shillings, in British money.

On November the 5th, of 1787, Josiah Martin lost 300 acres of land, to confiscation, in Montgomery County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 300 acres, to John Hopkins, for the sum of 121 pounds, in British money.

On November the 5th, of 1787, Josiah Martin lost 160 acres of land, to confiscation, in Montgomery County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 160 acres, to Mark Allen, for the sum of 10 pounds, in British money.

On November the 5th, of 1787, Josiah Martin lost 160 acres of land, to confiscation, in Montgomery County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 160 acres, to Mark Allen, for the sum of 17 pounds and 17 shillings, in British money.

On November the 5th, of 1787, Josiah Martin lost 160 acres of land, to confiscation, in Montgomery County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 160 acres, to Mark Allen, for the sum of 20 pounds, in British money.

Masters, Private Henry

Private Henry Masters served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Henry Masters’ unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no further information about Private Henry Masters.

Maultsby, Lieutenant William

Lieutenant William Maultsby served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Lieutenant William Maultsby’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no additional details about Lieutenant William Maultsby.

McAlister, Private Donald

Private Donald McAlister served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Donald McAlister’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no further information about Private Donald McAlister.

McAlpine, Lieutenant Donald

Lieutenant Donald McAlpine was born in Scotland. He volunteered in North Carolina at the age of 48. Lieutenant Donald McAlpine began his military career between 1777 and 1783. We have no other knowledge about Lieutenant Donald McAlpine.

McArthur, Captain Neill

Captain Neill McArthur was born in Scotland. He volunteered in North Carolina at the age of 42. Captain Neil McArthur began his military career beginning in 1777 and ending in 1783. The Right Honorable Lord Sidney, His Majesty’s the principle Secretarys of State for the home department, memorialized Captain Neill McArthur, after his death. Colonel John Hamilton, Esquire of the Royal North Carolina Regiment, also memorialized Captain Neill McArthur, after his death. We have no additional details about Captain Neil McArthur’s life or military career.

McCaskel, Ensign Alexander

Ensign Alexander McCaskel was born in Scotland. He volunteered in North Carolina at the age of 21. Ensign Alexander McCaskel began his military career North Carolina in 1777. His military service lasted through the end of the American Revolution in 1783. We have no other information about Ensign Alexander McCaskel’s life or career.

McCaskil, Private John

Private John McCaskil was from Anson County, North Carolina, and belonged to Anson County Regiment. The commanding officer was Colonel Duncan Ray. His unit was stationed in Charlestown, South Carolina. Private John McCaskil was a refugee of North Carolina. We have no other knowledge about Private John McCaskil.

McClellan, William

William McClellan was a member of the community of Loyalists, in North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution, the State of North Carolina, as well as the other states began confiscating most of the Loyalist’s lands. The states, then sold almost all of the lands, to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On March the 14th, of 1786, William McClellan lost 50 acres of land, to confiscation, in Edgecombe County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 50 acres, to Edward Hall, for the sum of 760 pounds and 10 shillings, in British money. This entry spells William McClellan’s name, William McClelans.

On October the 24th, of 1786, William McClellan lost an unknown amount of land, to confiscation, in Edgecombe County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of land, to John Gray Blount, for the sum of 302 pounds, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786, William McClellen lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Edgecombe County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of acres of land, to Richard Blackledge for the sum of 1,160 pounds, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786, William McClellen lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Edgecombe County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of acres of land, to Edward Hall, for the sum of 600 pounds, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786, William McClellan lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Edgecombe County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of acres of land, to Jonathan Loomas, for the of 130 pounds, in British money.

McColl, Sergeant Alexander

Sergeant Alexander McColl served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Sergeant Alexander McColl’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no other knowledge about Alexander McColl.

McColl, Lieutenant Daniel

Lieutenant Daniel McColl was from Anson County, North Carolina, and belonged to Anson County Regiment. The commanding officer was Colonel Duncan Ray. His unit was stationed in Charlestown, South Carolina. Lieuntenant Daniel McColl was a refugee of North Carolina. We have no further information about Lieutenant Daniel McColl.

McCulloch or McCulloh, Henry E.

Henry E. McCulloch was one of the wealthiest men the the British Colonies in America. He received a great deal of land from the British Crown. This made him very loyal to the Crown; when the American Revolution broke out. Henry E. McCulloch became the Secretary of North Carolina. He also, held other offices in North Carolina. When the Revolution began in 1775, Henry E. McCulloch; he gradually had almost all
of his land confiscated.

As the American Revolution came to a close; Henry E. McCulloch lost 64 acres to confiscation in Anson County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina sold those same 64 acres to William Bowman for the sum of 30 pounds in British money.

When the Revolutionary War was almost over; Henry E. McCulloch lost another 58 acres, to confiscation, in Anson County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina sold those same 58 acres, to William Bowman for the sum of 20 pounds in British money.

On December the 26, of 1782, Henry E. McCulloch lost 299 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina sold the same 299 acres, to John Steel for the sum of 300 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 212 acres of land, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 212 acres, to James Williams for the sum of 324 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 258 acres of land, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 258 acres to James Williams for the sum of 363 pounds, in British Money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 159 acres of land, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 159 acres, to James Williams for the sum of 175 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 325 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 325 acres, to James Williams for the sum of 420 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 230 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 230 acres, to James Williams for the sum of 151 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 204 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 204 acres, to James Williams for the sum of 443 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 1270 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 1270 acres, to James Williams for the sum of 202 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 132 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 132 acres, to James Williams for the sum of 75 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 270 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 270 acres, to James Williams for the sum of 270 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 117 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 117 acres, to James Williams for the sum of 170 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 184 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 184 acres, to James Williams for the sum of 102 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 180 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 180 acres, to James Williams for the sum of 180 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 214 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 214 acres, to James Williams for the sum of 124 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 270 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 270 acres, to James Williams for the sum of 356 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 152 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 152 acres, to James Williams for the sum of 153 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 226 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 226 acres, to James Williams for the sum of 161 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 461 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 461 acres, to James Williams for the sum of 233 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 208 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 208 acres, to Thomas Clark for the sum of 305 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 357 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 357 acres, to Thomas Clark for an unknown sum of pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 140 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 140 acres, to Henry Cook for the sum of 60 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 560 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 560 acres, to Thomas Burke for an unknown sum of pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 380 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 380 acres, to Jacob Richards for the sum of 301 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 111 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 111 acres, to James Williams for the sum of 105 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 270 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 270 acres, to Thomas Mulholland for the sum of 101 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 100 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 100 acres, to James Mebane and Thomas Mulholland, for the sum of 41 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 295 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 295 acres, to James Mebane and Thomas Mulholland, for the sum of 105 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 253 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 253 acres, to James Mebane and Thomas Mulholland, for the sum of 85 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 264 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 264 acres, to Andrew Ross, for the sum of 151 pound, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 163 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 163 acres, to Andrew Ross, for the sum of 151 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 530 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 530 acres, to Andrew Ross, for the sum of 300 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 1 acre, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 1 acre, to Andrew Ross, for the sum of 60 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 400 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 400 acres, to John Taylor and James Mebane, for the sum of 467 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 296 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 296 acres, to John Taylor and James Mebane, for the sum of 161 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 225 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 225 acres, to John Taylor and James Mebane, for the sum of 151 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 347 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 347 acres, to John Taylor and James Mebane, for the sum of 382 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 225 acres of land, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 225 acres, to James Thackston, for the sum of 803 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 335 acres of land, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 335 acres, to James Thackston, for the sum of 472 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 126 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 126 acres, to Spruce McCoy, for the sum of 301 pounds, in British money.

On November the 13th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 298 acres of land, to confiscation, in Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 298 acres, to Britain Fuller, for an unknown amount of money, in British pounds.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 159 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 159 acres to Spruce McCoy, for the sum of 168 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost more than 2 acres of land, or more to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same more than 2 acres, to Spruce McCoy, for the sum of 301 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 372 acres of land, to confiscation, in Wake County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 372 acres, to William Moore, for the sum of 471 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 372 acres of land, to confiscation, in Wake County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 372 acres, to William Moore, for the sum of 463 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 330 acres of land, to confiscation, in Wake County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 330 acres, to William Moore, for the sum of 238 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 200 acres of land, to confiscation, in Wake County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 200 acres, to William Moore, for the sum of 141 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 164 acres of land, to confiscation, in Wake County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 164 acres, to William Moore, for the sum of 80 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 330 acres of land, to confiscation, in Wake County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 330 acres, to William Moore, for the sum of 281 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 244 acres of land, to confiscation, in Wake County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 244 acres, to William Moore, for the sum of 491 pounds, in British money.

On January the 9th, of 1784, Henry E. McCulloch lost 291 acres of land, to confiscation, Wake County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 291 acres, to Nicholas Long Jr., for the sum of 363 pounds, in British money.

On March the 9th, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost 217 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 217 acres, to Francis Lock Sr., for the sum of 200 pounds, in British money.

On March the 9th, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost 102 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 102 acres, to John Lewis Beard, for the sum of 175 pounds and 1 shilling, in British money.

On March the 9th, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost 305 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 305 acres, to Conrod Brim (possibly Conrad Brim), for the sum of 392 pounds, in British money.

On March the 9th, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost 482 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 482 acres, to John Lewis Beard, for the sum of 200 pounds, in British money.

On March the 23rd, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost 200 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 200 acres, to Francis Lock, for the sum of 200 pounds and 1 shilling, in British money.

On March the 23rd, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost 365 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 365 acres, to Francis Lock, for the sum of 266 pounds, in British money.

On March the 23rd, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of acres, to Francis Lock Sr., for the sum of 303 pounds, in British money.

On March the 23rd, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of acres, to David Woodson, for the sum of 150 pounds, in British money.

On March the 23rd, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of acres, to Mathew Lock Sr., for the sum of 204 pounds, in British money.

On March the 23rd, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost  193 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 193 acres, to Mathew Lock., for the sum of 258 pounds, in British money.

On March the 23rd, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost 263 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 263 acres, to David Woodson, for the sum of 420 pounds, in British money.

On March the 23rd, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost 213 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 213 acres, to David Woodson, for the sum of 300 pounds, in British money.

On March the 23rd, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost 377 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 377 acres, to Samuel Cummens, for the sum of 502 pounds, in British money.

On March the 23rd, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost 193 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 193 acres, to Andrew Beard, for the sum of 71 pounds and 1 shilling, in British money.

On March the 23rd, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost 247 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 247 acres, to James Crage, for the sum of 126 pounds and 40 shillings, in British money.

On March the 23rd, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost 375 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 375 acres, to David Crage, for the sum of 150 pounds and 10 shillings, in British money.

On March the 25th, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost 343 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 343 acres, to Benjamin Abbott, for the sum of 43 pounds and 9 shillings, in British money.

On March the 25th, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost 139 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 139 acres, to Maxwell Chambers, for the sum of 236 pounds, in British money.

On March the 25th, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost 366 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 366 acres, to Maxwell chambers, for the sum of 428 pounds, in British money.

On March the 27th, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost 200 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 200 acres, to Anthoney Numon, for the sum of 227 pounds, in British money.

On March the 27th, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost 175 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 175 acres, to Anthoney Numon, for the sum of 277 pounds, in British money.

On March the 28th, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost 336 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 336 acres, to Valentine Beard, for the sum of 826 pounds, in British money.

On March the 28th, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost over 20 acres of land, to confiscation,  in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same over 20 acres, to Robert Martin, for the sum of 231 pounds, in British money.

On March the 30th, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost 375 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 375 acres, to John Lewis Beard, for the sum of 301 pounds, in British money.

On March the 30th, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost over 28 hundred acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same over 28 hundred acres, to David Crage, for the sum of 291 pounds, in British money.

On March the 30th, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost over 37 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same over 37 acres, to John Lewis Beard, for the sum of 200 pounds, in British money.

On March the 30th, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost 380 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 380 acres, to James Crage, for the sum of 385 pounds, in British money.

On March the 30th, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost 340 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 340 acres, to Radford Ellis, for the sum of 341 pounds, in British money.

On March the 30th, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost 425 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 425 acres, to Jacob Wootsman, for the sum of 100 pounds, in British money.

On March the 31st, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost 115 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 115 acres, to Peter Frost, for the sum of 117 pounds, in British money.

On April the 25th, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost 120 acres of land, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 120 acres, to Thomas H. Purkins (We believe this entry to be Thomas H. Perkins), for the sum of 70 pounds, in British money.

On April the 25th, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost 350 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 350 acres, to Thomas H. Purkins (We believe this entry to be Thomas H. Perkins), for the sum of 130 pounds, in British money.

On April the 25th, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost 156 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 156 acres, to Thomas H. Purkins (We believe this entry to be Thomas H. Perkins), for the sum of 302 pounds, in British money.

On April the 25th, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost 120 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 120 acres, to Thomas H. Perkins, for the sum of 70 pounds, in British money.

On April the 25th, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost 350 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 350 acres, to Thomas H. Perkins, for the sum of 130 pounds, in British money.

On April the 25th, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost 156 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 156 acres, to Thomas H. Perkins, for the sum of 302 pounds, in British money.

On April the 25th, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost 232 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 232 acres, to Thomas H. Perkins for the sum of 155 pounds, in British money.

On April the 25th, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost 325 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 325 acres, to Thomas H. Perkins, for the sum of 113 pounds, in British money.

On April the 25th, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost 232 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 232 acres, to Thomas H. Purkins (We believe this entry to be Thomas H. Perkins), for the sum of 155 pounds, in British money.

On April the 25th, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost 325 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 325 acres, to Thomas H. Purkins (We believe the entry to be Thomas H. Perkins), for the sum of 113 pounds, in British money.

On April the 25th, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost 298 acres, to confiscation, in Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 298 acres, to James Roberts, for the sum of 100 pounds, in British money.

On April the 25th, of 1785, Henry E. McCulloch lost 357 acres, to confiscation, in Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 357 acres, to William Bailey, for the sum of 105 pounds and 13 shillings, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 560 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 560 acres, to William Lytle, for the sum of 1,270 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 115 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 115 acres, to James Williams, for the sum of 122 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 102 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 102 acres, to Tilghman Dixon for the sum of 206 pounds and 2 shillings, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 33 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 33 acres, to James Thompson for the sum of 100 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 208 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 208 acres, to Samuel Parker for the sum of 401 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 200 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 200 acres, to William O’Neal for the sum of 325 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 115 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina.The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 115 acres, to Michael Mozer for the sum of 227 pounds in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 170 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 170 acres, to William Sheppard for the sum of 311 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 292 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 292 acres, to George Dauhorty for the sum of 307 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 112 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 112 acres, to Phillip Mozer for the sum of 150 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 640 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 640 acres, to Martin Cole for the sum of 305 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 90 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 90 acres, to William Rea for the sum of 166 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 225 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 225 acres, to William Lytle for the sum of 325 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 240 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 240 acres, to John Counts for the sum of 305 pounds and 10 shillings, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost an unknown amount of land to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of land to Samuel Campbell for the sum of 80 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 230 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 230 acres, to Joseph Noey for the sum of 231 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 23 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 23 acres, to John McDaniel for the sum of 100 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 69 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 69 acres, to William McCauley for the sum of 125 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 108 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 108 acres, to James Williams for the sum of 110 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 155 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 155 acres, to Henry Cooke for the sum of 51 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 60 acres, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 60 acres, to Henry Thompson for the sum of 120 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the unknown amount of acres of land, to James Thompson for the sum of 102 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 243 acres, to confiscation, in Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 243 acres, to Patrick Travers, for the sum of 410 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 243 acres, to confiscation, in Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 243 acres to William Lytle, for the sum of 215 pounds, in  British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 250 acres, to confiscation, in Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 250 acres to William Lytle, for the sum of 501 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 136 acres, to confiscation, in Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 136 acres, to James Clark, for the sum of 181 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 243 acres, to confiscation, in Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 243 acres, to William Bailey, for the sum of 252 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 243 acres, to confiscation, in Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 243 acres, to William Bailey, for the sum of 452 pounds and 1 shilling, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 397 acres, to confiscation, in Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 397 acres, to Samuel Park, for the sum of 761 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 243 acres, to confiscation, in Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 243 acres, to Samuel Travers, for the sum of 501 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 243 acres, to confiscation, in Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 243 acres, to William Pickett, for the sum of 471 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 243 acres, to confiscation, in Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 243 acres, to Patrick Travers, for the sum of 534 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 243 acres, to confiscation, in Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 243 acres, to Patrick Travers, for the sum of 381 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 75 acres, to confiscation, in Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 75 acres, to William Bell, for the sum of 151 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 272 acres, to confiscation, in Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 272, to William Bell, for the sum of 403 pounds and 3 shillings, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 250 acres, to confiscation, in Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 250, to Patrick Travers, for the sum of 1,000 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 243 acres, to confiscation, in Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 243, to Patrick Travers, for the sum of 381 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 75 acres, to confiscation, in Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 75 acres, to William Bell, for the sum of 151 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 272 acres, to confiscation, in Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 272 acres, to William Bell, for the sum of 403 pounds and 3 shillings, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 250 acres, to confiscation, in Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 250 acres, to Patrick Travers, for the sum of 1,000 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCuloch lost 160 acres, to confiscation, in Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 160 acres, to John Stanfield, for the sum of 355 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 250 acres, to confiscation, in Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 250 acres, to Alexander Nelson, for the sum of 315 pounds in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 260 acres, to confiscation, in Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 260 acres, to Francis Arnold, for the sum of 452 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 169 acres, to confiscation, in Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 169 acres, to Patrick Travers, for the sum of 276 pounds and 11 shillings and 6 pence, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 290 acres, to confiscation, in Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 290 acres, to Patrick Travers, for the sum of 400 pounds and 3 shillings, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 200 acres, to confiscation, in Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 200 acres, to William York, for the sum of 231 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 260 acres, to confiscation, in Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 260 acres, to Patrick Travers, for the sum of 360 pounds and 1 shilling and 6 pence, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost 270 acres, to confiscation, in Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 260 acres, to John Clark, for the sum of 212 pounds, in British money.

On September the 25th, of 1786, Henry E. McCulloch lost an unknown amount of acres, to confiscation, in Guilford County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina sold that unknown amount of acres of land, to John Willis, for the sum of 615 pounds and 15 shillings, in British money.

On September the 25th, of 1786; Henry E. McCulloch lost an unknown amount of acres, to confiscation, in Guilford County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina sold that unknown amount of acres, to John Willis, for the sum of 637 pounds, in British money.

On September the 25th, of 1786; Henry E. McCulloch lost an unknown amount of acres, to confiscation, in Guilford County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina sold that unknown amount of acres, to James Williams, for the sum of 728 pounds, in British money.

On September the 25th, of 1786; Henry E. McCulloch lost an unknown amount of acres, to confiscation, in Guilford County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina sold that unknown amount of acres, to John Willis for the sum of 700 pounds, in British money.

On September the 25th, of 1786; Henry E. McCulloch lost an unknown amount of acres, to confiscation, in Guilford County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina sold that unknown amount of acres, to John Willis, for the sum of 725 pounds, in British money.

On September the 25th, of 1786; Henry E. McCulloch lost 4 acres, to confiscation, in Guilford County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina sold the same 4 acres, to John Willis, for the sum of 1,400 pounds, in British money.

On September the 25th, of 1786; Henry E. McCulloch lost 328 acres, to confiscation, in Guilford County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina sold the same 328 acres, to John Willis, for the sum of 1,400 pounds, in British money.

On September the 25th, of 1786; Henry E. McCulloch lost 256 acres, to confiscation, in Guilford County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina sold the same 256 acres, to John Willis, for the sum of 256 pounds, in British money.

On September the 25th, of 1786; Henry E. McCulloch lost 350 acres, to confiscation, in Guilford County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina sold the same 350 acres, to John Willis, for the sum of 350 pounds, in British money.

On September the 25th, of 1786; Henry E. McCulloch lost 234 acres, to confiscation, in Guilford County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina sold the same 234 acres, to John Willis, for the sum of 453 pounds, in British money.

On September the 25th, of 1786; Henry E. McCulloch lost 234 acres, to confiscation, in Guilford County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina sold the same 234 acres, to John Willis, for the sum of 453 pounds, in British money.

On September the 25th, of 1786; Henry E. McCulloch lost 324 acres, to confiscation, in Guilford County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina sold the same 324 acres, to John Willis, for the sum of 623 pounds, in British money.

On September the 25th, of 1786; Henry E. McCulloch lost 147 acres, to confiscation, in Guilford County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina sold the same 147 acres, to James Lyne, for the sum of 356 pounds, in British money.

On September the 25th, of 1786; Henry E. McCulloch lost 150 acres, to confiscation, in Guilford County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina sold the same 150 acres, to James Lyne for the sum of 326 pounds, in British money.

On September the 25th, of 1786; Henry E. McCulloch lost 270 acres, to confiscation, in Guilford County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina sold the same 270 acres, to James Lyne for the sum of 457 pounds, in British money.

On September the 25th, of 1786; Henry E. McCulloch lost 130 acres, to confiscation, in Guilford County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina sold the same 130 acres, to James Lyne for the sum of 206 pounds in British money.

On September the 25th, of 1786; Henry E. McCulloch lost 330 acres, to confiscation, in Guilford County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina sold the same 330 acres, to James Williams for the sum of 741 pounds in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786; Henry E. McCulloch lost 223 acres, to confiscation, in Guilford County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina sold the same 223 acres, to Robert Shew for the sum of 600 pounds in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786; Henry E. McCulloch lost 156 acres, to confiscation, in Guilford County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina sold the same 156 acres, to William Dick for the sum of 513 pounds in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786; Henry E. McCulloch lost 268 acres, to confiscation, in Guilford County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina sold the same 268 acres, to James Hambleton for the sum of 801 pounds in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786; Henry E. McCulloch lost over 200 acres, to confiscation, in Guilford County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina sold the same land, more than 200 acres, to Daniel McKindley for the sum of 250 pounds and 1 shilling in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786; Henry E. McCulloch lost 240 acres, to confiscation, in Guilford County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina sold the same 240 acres, to James Bell for the sum of 560 pounds in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786; Henry E. McCulloch lost 416 acres, to confiscation, in Guilford County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina sold the same 416 acres, to Samuel McDill for the sum of 417 pounds in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786; Henry E. McCulloch lost 200 acres, to confiscation, in Guilford County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina sold the same 200 acres, to Daniel McKindley for the sum of 201 pounds in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786; Henry E. McCulloch lost an unknown amount of land to confiscation, in Guilford County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina sold the same unknown amount of land, to Roddy Hanna for the sum of 550 pounds and 1 shilling, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786; Henry E. McCulloch lost 141 acres, to confiscation, in Guilford County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina sold the same 141 acres, to John Alcon, for the sum of 283 and 1 shilling pounds in British money.

On June the 29th, of 1787; Henry E. McCulloch lost 174 acres, to confiscation, in Guilford County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina sold the same 174 acres, to Thomas Clark, for the sum of 62 pounds in British money.

On June the 29th, of 1787; Henry E. McCulloch lost an unknown amount of acres, to confiscation, in Anson County, North Carolina. North Carolina sold that same unknown amount of acres, to Thomas Clark, for the sum of 52 pounds, in British money.

On June the 29th, of 1787; Henry E. McCulloch lost an unknown amount of acres, to confiscation in Anson County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, sold that same unknown amount of acres, to Thomas Clark, for the sum of 28 pounds, in British money.

On June the 29th, of 1787; Henry E. McCulloch lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation in Anson County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, sold that same unknown amount of acres, to Thomas Clark, for the sum of 83 pounds, in British money.

On June the 29th, of 1787; Henry E. McCulloch lost 100 acres of land, to confiscation, in Montgomery County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, sold those same 100 acres, to Thomas Clark, for the sum of 20 Pounds, in British money.

On the 29th of June in 1787; Henry E. McCulloch lost 64 acres of land, to confiscation, in Anson County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, sold those same 64 acres, to Thomas Clark, for the sum of 35 pounds, in British money.

On the 29th of June in 1787, Henry E. McCulloch lost 30 acres of land, to confiscation, in Anson County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the  same 30 acres, to Thomas Clark, for the sum of 12 pounds and 10 shillings, in British money.

On the 29th of June in 1787, Henry E. McCulloch lost 202 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 202 acres, to James Meeley for the sum of 525 pounds, in British money.

On the 29th of June in 1787, Henry E. McCulloch lost 220 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 220 acres, to James Meeley for the sum of 515 pounds, in British money.

On November the 5th, of 1787, Henry E. McCulloch lost 216 acres, to confiscation, in Guilford County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 216 acres, to Henry Ghiles, for the sum of 1,050 pounds, in British money.

On November the 5th, of 1787, Henry E. McCulloch lost 222 acres, to confiscation, in Montgomery County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 222 acres, to Jesse McClendon, for the sum of 500 pounds and 10 shillings, in British money.

On November the 5th, of 1787, Henry E. McCulloch lost 200 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 200 acres, to John Armstrong, for the sum of 1,160 pounds, in British money.

On November the 5th, of 1787, Henry E. McCulloch lost 218 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 218 acres, to John Armstrong, for the sum of 1,015 pounds, in British money.

On November the 5th, of 1787, Henry E. McCulloch lost 124 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 124 acres, to Henry Ghiles, for the sum of 1,000 pounds, in British money.

On the 15th of November in 1787; Henry E. McCulloch lost 506 acres, to confiscation, in Bertie County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold those same 506 acres to John Johnston, for the sum of 700 pounds, in British money.

On the 15th of November in 1787; Henry E. McCulloch lost 506 acres, to confiscation, in Bertie County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina,  then sold those same 506 acres to John Johnston, for the sum of 621 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787; Henry E. McCulloch lost 35 acres, to confiscation, in Montgomery County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, sold the same 35 acres, to William Sanders, for the sum of 17 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Henry E. McCulloch lost 54 acres to confiscation, in Montgomery County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the sames 35 acres, to William Sanders, for the sum of 29 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Henry E. McCulloch lost 120 acres, to confiscation, in Montgomery County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 120 acres, to William Sanders, for the sum of 40 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Henry E. McCulloch lost 56 acres, to confiscation, in Montgomery County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 56 acres, to William Sanders, for the sum of 37 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Henry E. McCulloch lost 381 acres, to confiscation, in Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 381 acres, to John Clark, for the sum of 1905 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Henry E. McCulloch lost 250 acres, to confiscation, in Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 250 acres, to William Lytle, for the sum of 1366 pounds and 13 shillings and 4 pence, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Henry E. McCulloch lost 438 acres, to confiscation, in Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 438 acres, to William Lytle, for the sum of 1481 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Henry E. McCulloch lost 282 acres of land, to confiscation, in Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 282 acres, to William Bell, for the sum of 1,031 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Henry E. McCulloch lost 282 acres of land, to confiscation, in Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 282 acres, to William Bell, for the sum of 1,005 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Henry E. McCulloch lost 438 acres of land, to confiscation, in Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 438 acres to William Lytle, for the sum of 1,405 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Henry E. McCulloch lost 282 acres of land, to confiscation, in Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 282 acres, to William Bell, for the sum of 1,151 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Henry E. McCulloch lost 310 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 310 acres, to Joseph Cunningham, for the sum of 201 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Henry E. McCulloch lost 218 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 218 acres, to Andrew Bostain, Sr., for the sum of 204 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Henry E. McCulloch lost 154 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 154 acres, to John Ford, for the sum of 200 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Henry E. McCulloch lost 216 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 216 acres, to Andrew Bastain, for the sum of 282 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Henry E. McCulloch lost 167 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 167 acres, to David Smith, for the sum of 117 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Henry E. McCulloch lost 237 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 237 acres, to Humphrey Brooks, for the sum of 392 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Henry E. McCulloch lost 96 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 96 acres, to David Craig, for the sum of 52 pounds and 2 shillings in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Henry E. McCulloch lost 231 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 231 acres, to Benjamin Roundseval, for the sum of 151 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Henry E. McCulloch lost 287 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 287 acres, to John Lopp, for the sum of 348 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Henry E. McCulloch lost 155 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 155 acres, to Beacham Hilton, for the sum of 115 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Henry E. McCulloch lost 400 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 400 acres, to Joseph Cunningham, for the sum of 351 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Henry E. McCulloch lost 152 acres of land, to confiscation, in Rowan County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 152 acres, to William Strange, for the sum of 170 pounds, in British money.

McDonald, Second Ensign Angus

Second Ensign Angus McDonald was from North Carolina. He was a member of the North Carolina Loyalist Army. We have no additional details about the life or career of Second Ensign Angus McDonald.

McDonald, Private Donald

Private Donald McDonald was from Anson County, North Carolina and belonged to Anson County Regiment. The commanding officer was Colonel Duncan Ray. His unit was stationed in Charlestown, South Carolina. Private Donald McDonald was a refugee of North Carolina. We have no other knowledge about Private Donald McDonald.

McDonald, Lieutenant John

Lieutenant John McDonald was born in Scotland. He volunteered in North Carolina at the age of 23. Lieutenant John McDonald began his military career between 1777 and 1783. We have no additional details about Lieutenant John McDonald.

McDonald, John

John McDonald was a Loyalist, from North Carolina. We don’t know, if the entry above is the same man as the one below. We know he was a landowner, before the American Revolution. As almost all Loyalists: he had his land confiscated.

On November the 15th, of 1787, John McDonald lost 1/2 acre of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 1/2 acre, to William K. Patrick, for the sum of 15 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, John McDonald lost 1/2 acre of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 1/2 acre, to Jesse Lassiter, for the sum of 9 pounds and 15 shillings, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, John McDonald lost 1/2 acre of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 1/2 acre, to G. J. McRee and Curtis Ivey, for the sum of 100 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, John McDonald lost 1/2 acre of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 1/2 acre, to Robert Scott, for the sum of 9 pounds and 10 shillings, in British money.

McDonald, Private Murdoch

Private Murdoch McDonald was from Anson County, North Carolina, and belonged to Anson County Regiment. The commanding officer was Colonel Duncan Ray. His unit was stationed in Charlestown, South Carolina. Private Murdoch McDonald was a refugee of North Carolina. We have no further information about Private Murdoch McDonald.

McDonald, Ensign Thomas

Ensign Thomas McDonald was born in Scotland. He volunteered in North Carolina at the age of 26. Ensign Thomas McDonald began his military career between 1777 and 1783. We have no other knowledge about Ensign Thomas McDonald.

McDonnell Colonel Allen

Colonel Allen McDonnell was from North Carolina. He served under the command of General Donald MacDonald (sometimes written as General Donald Mack Donald). Colonel Allen McDonnell and his unit were in charge of the prisoners of war. These prisoners were being returned to the Halifax Goal (or the Halifax Jail). This Jail was in Halifax, Halifax County, North Carolina. The prisoners were put in jail for carrying or transferring arms for the cause. This Movement of prisoners was took place on the 5th of April in 1776. We have no additional details of the life or military career of Colonel Allen McDonnell.

McDowell, The Reverend

The Reverend McDowell was a Loyalist in North Carolina. He was also, a landowner. As the American Revolution was coming to an end, the State of North Carolina, as well as other the other states started confiscating most of the Loyalists land. The states, then sold almost all of the property to the Patriots, or those people, who fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On November the 15th, of 1787, The Reverend McDowell lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Brunswick County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of acres, to Jacob Leonard, for the sum of 20 pounds and 10 shillings, in British money.

McDuffee, Private John

Private John McDuffee was from Bladen County, North Carolina. He was a member of the Bladen County, North Carolina Loyalist Militia. Sergeant John Plowman served under Colonel Gray. Colonel Robert Gray was the Paymaster of the North Carolina Militia. Sergeant John Plowman was stationed in Charlestown (now Charleston), South Carolina. He was a Private in 1782. We have no other information of Sergeant John Plowman’s life or career.

McDugald, Ensign Archibald

Ensign Archibald McDugald was born in Scotland. He volunteered in North Carolina at the age of 27. Ensign Archibald McDugald began his military career between 1777 and 1783. We have no additional details about Ensign Archibald McDugald.

McDugald, Colonel Archibald

Colonel Archibald McDugald was a member of the North Carolina Loyalist Militia. He and his unit were from North Carolina. Colonel Archibald McDugald and his men were stationed in either North Carolina or South Carolina for the duration of the American Revolution. We have no additional knowledge of Colonel Archibald McDugald.

McDugald, Randol

Randol McDugald was a member of the Loyalist living in North Carolina. He was a landowner. As the American Revolution was coming to a close, the individual states confiscated the Loyalist’s land. The states, including North Carolina, then sold the land to the Patriots, or the people, who supported the American cause.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Randol McDugald lost 350 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 350 acres, to Allen McDugald, for the sum of 110 pounds, in British money.

McDugall, Randol

Randol McDugall was a member of the Loyalists living in North Carolina. He was a landowner. As the American Revolution came to a close, the individual states confiscated the Loyalists land. The States, then sold most of the land to the Patriots, or people, who fought or gave aid for the American cause. Randol McDugall and Randol McDugall could be the same person.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Randol McDugall lost 200 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 200 acres, to Daniel Shaw, for the sum of 201 pounds, in British money.

McEachan, Archibald

Archibald McEachan was a Loyalist from North Carolina. As the American Revolution was ending, the individual states started confiscating the land of the Loyalists. The states, then sold the land to the Patriots, or the people, who fought or gave aid to the American cause. This entry and the one spelled McEachron may be the same person.

On November the 15th, 1787, Archibald McEachan, lost 100 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 100 acres, to Elias Barnes, for the sum of 25 and 5 shillings pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, 1787, Archibald McEachan, lost 100 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 100 acres, to Robert Raiford, for the sum of 30 pounds, in British money.

McEachron, Ensign Archibald

Ensign Archibald McEachron was born in Scotland. He volunteered in North Carolina at the age of 34. Ensign Archibald McEachron began his military career between 1777 and 1783. We have no other knowledge about Ensign Archibald McEachron.

McFall, Neal

Neal McFall was a Loyalist living in North Carolina. After the American Revolution, He and many other loyalists had their land confiscated by their individual states. The land was, then sold to the Patriots or those, who fought or gave aid to the American side of the war.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Neal McFall, lost 50 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 50 acres, to Jacob Rhodes, for the sum of 76 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Neal McFall, lost 100 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 100 acres, to Jacob Rhodes, for the sum of 85 pounds, in British money.

McFarland, Peter

Peter McFarland was a member of the Loyalists, in North Carolina. He was a landholder. At the end of the American Revolution, the State of North Carolina, as well as other states confiscated the Loyalists land. The land was, then sold by each state to the Patriots or people on the American side, during the war.

On November the 15th, 1787, Peter McFarland, lost 100 acres of land, to Confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 100 acres, to William Watson, for the sum of 95 pounds, in British money.

McFatter, Private Donald Senior

Private Donald McFatter Senior served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Donald McFatter Senior’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no further information about Private Donald McFatter Senior.

McFattar, Sergeant Donald Junior

Sergeant Donald McFattar Junior served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Sergeant Donald McFattar Junior’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no additional details about Sergeant Donald McFattar, Junior.

McInnes Captain Donald

Captain Donald McInnes was from Anson County, North Carolina. He served in a North Carolina Loyalist Militia formed from several North Carolina counties. He was a member of one of the units that was in charge of the Refugees from North Carolina and South Carolina. We have no further information of the life or career of Captain Donald McInnes.

McKay, Lieutenant Colonel Archibald

Lieutenant Colonel Archibald McKay was a member of the Royal Militia of Cumberland County, North Carolina. He and his unit were stationed in Charlestown (now Charleston), South Carolina. Lieutenant Colonel Archibald McKay and his unit were assigned to Charlestown, South Carolina on January 17, 1782. He and his Regiment were part of the group watching over refugees from North Carolina and South Carolina. We have no additional knowledge of the life or career of Lieutenant Colonel Archibald Mckay.

McKeal, John

John McKeal was a member of the community of Loyalists, living in North Carolina. He was also a landowner. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as the other states, began confiscating most of the Loyalist’s lands. The states, then sold the lands to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On November the 15th, of 1787, John McKeal lost 200 acres of land, to confiscation, in Moore County, North Carolina. The state of North Carolina, the sold the same 200 acres, to G. J. McRee and Curtis Ivey, for the sum of 91 pounds, in British money.

McKeathan, Lieutenant Dugald

Lieutenant Dugald McKeathan was born in Scotland. He volunteered in North Carolina at the age of 24. Lieutenant Dugald McKeathan began his military career between 1777 and 1783. We have no further information about Lieutenant Dugald McKeathan.

McKeithan, Private Archibald

Private Archibald McKeithan served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Archibald McKeithan’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no other knowledge about Private Archibald McKeithan.

McKeithan, Second Captain Donald

Second Captain Donald McKeithan served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Second Captain Donald McKeithan’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no further information about Second Captain Donald McKeithan.

McKenzie, Adjutant John

Adjutant John McKenzie served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Adjutant John McKenzie’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending of the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no other knowledge about Adjutant John McKenzie.

McKitrick

McKitrick was a loyalist living in North Carolina, at the beginning of the American Revolution. We don’t know his first name. We don’t know what happened to McKitrick after the war began. We have no other information about the life death or burial of the man known as McKitrick.

On November the 15th, of 1787, McKitrick lost 2 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bertie County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 2 acres, to John Pouns, for the sum of 225 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, McKitrick lost an unknown amount of land, to confiscation, in Bertie County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of land, to Benjamin Bryan, for the sum of 530 pounds and 10 shillings, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, McKitrick lost 2 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bertie County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 2 acres, to Benjamin Baar, for the sum of 362 pounds and 10 shillings, in British money.

McLean, Private Hector

Private Hector McLean was from Anson County, North Carolina, and belonged to Anson County Regiment. The commanding officer was Colonel Duncan Ray. His unit was stationed in Charlestown, South Carolina. Private Hector McLean was a refugee of North Carolina. We have no additional details about Private Hector McLean.

McLean, Captain John

Captain John McLean was from Anson County, North Carolina. He was the commanding officer of his unit. Captain John McLean’s term of service began in 1781 and ended on the 17 of January, 1782. We have no other knowledge about Captain John McLean.

McLeod, Private Norman

Private Norman McLeod was from North Carolina. He served in the Loyalist North Carolina Militia. Private Norman McLeod was wounded in battle. The Commandant ordered, that he, be paid two Guineas; because he was wounded in battle. Private Norman McLeod and his unit were in charge of the Refugees from North Carolina and South Carolina. This campaign lasted from 1781 through 1782. We have no further information of the life or military career of Private Norman McLeod.

McLeod, Sergeant

Sergeant McLeod was from Anson County, North Carolina. He was a member of the Anson County, North Carolina Loyalist Militia. We have no first name for Sergeant McLeod. He was stationed in Charlestown (now Charleston), South Carolina. Sergeant McLeod was under the command of Lieutenant General Leslie. He began his service in Charlestown, South Carolina in the 28 of May, in 1782. We have no additional details about the life or career of Sergeant McLeod.

McLennan, Ensign Alexander

Ensign Alexander McLennan was from Anson County, North Carolina, and belonged to Anson County Regiment. The commanding officer was Colonel Duncan Ray. His unit was stationed in Charlestown, South Carolina. Ensign Alexander McLennan was a refugee of North Carolina. We have no further information about Ensign Alexander McLennan.

McLennan, Sergeant Roderick

Sergeant Roderick McLennan was a member of the Loyalist Anson County Militia of North Carolina. He was stationed in Charlestown (now Charleston), South Carolina. As of the 28th of May in 1782, Sergeant Roderick McLennan was ordered along with his regiment to Charlestown by Lieutenant General Leslie. We have no additional details of Sergeant Roderick McLennan’s life or his military career.

McLennan, Private James

Private James McLennan was from Anson County, North Carolina, and belonged to Anson County Regiment. The commanding officer was Colonel Duncan Ray. His unit was stationed in Charlestown, South Carolina. Private James McLennan was a refugee of North Carolina. We have no other knowledge about Private James McLennan.

McLeod, Surgeon Marmaduke

Surgeon Marmaduke McLeod was born in Scotland. He volunteered in North Carolina at the age of 40. Surgeon Marmaduke McLeod began his military career between 1777 and 1783. We have no additional details about Surgeon Marmaduke McLeod.

McLeod, Lieutenant Roderick

Lieutenant Roderick McLeod was born in Scotland. He volunteered in North Carolina at the age of 36. Lieutenant Roderick McLeod began his military career between 1777 and 1783. We have no further information about Lieutenant Roderick McLeod.

McNair, Ralph

Ralph McNair was a member of the Loyalist community of North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as the other states began confiscating most of the Loyalist’s land. The states then, sold almost all of the land, to the Patriots, or those, who fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On November the 15th, 1787, Ralph McNair lost 177 acres of land, to confiscation, in Chatham County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 177 acres, to John Montgomery, for the sum of 183 pounds, in British money.

McNiel, Captain Daniel

Captain Daniel McNiel was born in America. He volunteered in North Carolina at the age of 28. Captain Daniel McNiel began his military career between 1777 and 1783. We have no additional details about Captain Daniel McNiel.

McNeel, Hector

Hector McNeel was a Loyalist living in North Carolina. He was a landowner. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as the other states confiscated almost all the Loyalist land. The states, then sold the land to the Patriots, or people, who fought or gave aid to the American Cause. This Hector McNeel is probably the same person as Lieutenant Colonel Hector McNiel.

McNeel, Jame

James McNeel was a member of the Loyalist community, living in North Carolina. He was also a landowner. At end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as other states began confiscating almost all of the Loyalist’s lands. The states, then sold most of the lands to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the american cause.

On March the 14th, of 1786, James McNeel lost 140 acres of land, to confiscation, in Halifax County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 140 acres, to Fanney NcNeel, for the sum of 2,000 pounds, in British money. Fanney McNeel may have been the wife or sister of James McNeel. This would be a way of letting him keep the land.

On March the 14th, of 1786, James McNeel lost 208 acres of land, to confiscation, in Nash County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 208 acres, to Fanney McNeel, for the sum of 304 pounds, in British money. Fanney may have been the wife or sister of James McNeel. This would be a way of letting him keep the land.

On March the 14th, of 1786, James McNeel lost 384 acres of land, to confiscation, in Nash County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 384 acres, to James Armstrong, for the sum of 2,600 pounds, in British money.

McNeil, Lieutenant Colonel Hector

Lieutenant Colonel Hector McNeil was a member of the Royal North Carolina Militia of Bladen County, North Carolina. His unit was stationed in Charlestown, South Carolina. Lieutenant Colonel Hector McNeil and his unit were assigned to Charlestown (now Charleston), South Carolina, as of January 17, 1782. His unit served the Commandant of Refugees. We have no further information about Lieutenant Colonel Hector McNeil’s life, death or military career.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Hector McNiel lost 100 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 100 acres, to James Spiller, for the sum of 22 pounds and 3 shillings, in British money.

McQueen, Quarter Master William

Quarter Master William McQueen joined the North Carolina Loyalist Militia. He was the Quarter Master of the Refugees of the Second Class. Quarter Master William McQueen was stationed in Charlestown (now Charleston), South Carolina by order of Lieutenant General Leslie. The Quarter Masters of the Refugees were from different Districts. Paymaster Colonel Robert Gray was the Paymaster of Quarter Master William McQueen. He was from one of the North Carolina Districts. Quarter Master William McQueen served in Charlestown, South Carolina, from the period of time from the 15th day of January in 1782, through the 30th day of June in 1782. We have no other knowledge of the life, death or military career of Quarter Master William McQueen.

Mercer, Joseph

Joseph Mercer was a Loyalist living in North Carolina. He was a landowner. After the American Revolution, the states including North Carolina, began confiscating Loyalist land. The states, then sold the land mostly to the Patriots, or the people, who fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Joseph Mercer lost 124 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 124 acres, to Jesse Lasseter or Lassiter, for the sum of 83 pounds and 10 shillings, in British money.

Mercer, Noah

Noah Mercer was a Loyalist living in North Carolina. He was a landowner. After the American Revolution, the states including North Carolina, began confiscating Loyalist land. The states, then sold the land mostly to the Patriots, or people, who fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Noah Mercer lost 148 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 148 acres, to William Moore, for the sum of 105 pounds and 5 shillings, in British money.

Miller and Company

Miller and Company were Members of the Loyalist’s community in North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution, the State of North Carolina, as well as other states, began confiscating the Loyalist’ lands. The states, then sold the lands, to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Miller and Company lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of acres of land, to Patrick St. Lauranse, for an unknown sum of Pounds, in British money.

Miller, Andrew

Andrew Miller was a member of the Loyalist’s community, living in North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as the other states began confiscating most of the Loyalist’s lands. The states then, sold the land to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On March the 14th, of 1786, Andrew Miller lost 105 acres of land, to confiscation, in Halifax County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 105 acres, to John Clayton for the sum of 606 pounds and 5 shillings, in British money.

On March the 14th, of 1786, Andrew Miller lost over 300 acres of land, to confiscation, in Halifax County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same over 300 acres, to Nicholas Long, for the sum of 350 pounds, in British money.

On March the 14th, of 1786, Andrew Miller lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Halifax County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of acres of land, to John Pouns, for the sum of 1,651 pounds, in British money.

On March the 14th, of 1786, Andrew Miller lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Halifax County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of acres of land, to John Geddy, for the sum of 382 pounds, in British money.

On March the 14th, of 1786, Andrew Miller and Company (We don’t know who, in particular, made up the company, with Andrew Miller) lost an unknown amount of acres, to confiscation, in Halifax County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of acres of land, to John Geddy, for the sum of 290 pounds, in British money.

On March the 14th, of 1786, Andrew Miller and Company (We don’t know who, in particular, made up  the company, with Andrew Miller) lost an unknown amount of acres, to confiscation, in Halifax County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of acres of land, to John Pouns, for the sum of 320 pounds, in British money.

On March the 14th, of 1786, Andrew Miller and Company(We don’t know who, in particular, made up the company, with Andrew Miller) lost an unknown amount of acres, to confiscation, in Halifax County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of acres of land, to John Pouns, for the sum of 636 pounds, in British money.

Miller, James

James Miller was a member of the Loyalist’s community, in North Carolina. He was also, a landowner. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina,as well as the other states, began confiscating almost all of the Loyalist’s lands. The states, then sold most of the lands, to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid, for the American cause.

On June the 5th, of 1784, James Miller lost 1 acre of land, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 1 acre, to James Allison, for the sum of an unknown amount of pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, James Miller lost 1 acre of land, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 1 acre, to Jacob Richards, for the sum of 101 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, James Miller lost 1 acre of land, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 1 acre, to Andrew Ross, for the sum of 60 pounds, in British money.

Miller, Young

Young Miller and Company were members of the Loyalist community in North Carolina. Young and his partners were also, landowners. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as the other states, began confiscating most of the Loyalist’s lands. The states, then sold almost all of the lands to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause. Young Miller and Company could be Young Miller and Company. We don’t know if, Young Miller is one or two people.

On August the 25th, of 1784, Young Miller and Company lost 1 acre of land, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 1 acre, to George Daugherty, for the sum of 4,558 pounds, in British money.

Milner, James

James Milner was a member of the Loyalist, living in North Carolina. He was, also a landowner. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as the other states, began confiscating almost all of the loyalist’s lands. The states, then sold most of the lands, to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid, for the American cause.

On March the 25th, of 1786, James Milner lost 478 acres of land, to confiscation, in Halifax County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 478 acres, to Henri Gerrard, for the sum of 400 pounds, in British money.

On March the 25th, of 1786, James Milner lost 1/2 acre of land, to confiscation, in Halifax County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 1/2 acre, to Lunsford Long, for the sum of 85 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, James Milner lost 180 acres of land, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 180 acres, to Tilghman Dixon, for the sum of 1,110 pounds, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, James Milner lost 64 acres of land , to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 64 acres, to William Cabe, for the sum of 450 pounds and 1 shilling, in British money.

On August the 25th, of 1786, James Milner lost 186 acres of land, to confiscation, in Orange County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 186 acres, to John Flintham, for the sum of 841 pounds, in British money.

Moire, James

James Moire was a member of the community of Loyalists, living in North Carolina. He was also, a landowner. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as other states, began confiscating almost all of the Loyalist Lands. The states, then sold the lands, to the patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On October the 24th, 1786, James Moire lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Edgecombe County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of acres of land, to William Tuton, for the sum of 406 pounds, in British money.

On October the 24th, 1786, James Moire lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Edgecombe County, North Carolina, The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of acres of land, to James Armstrong, for the sum of 210 pounds, in British money.

Moore, Private Gabriel

Private Gabriel Moore served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Gabriel Moore’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no further information about Private Gabriel Moore’s life, death or military career.

Moore, Lieutenant Colonel John

Lieutenant Colonel John Moore was from North Carolina. He was a member of the North Carolina Loyalist Militia. Lieutenant Colonel John Moore was in charge of the payroll for the regiment. This was his duty in 1782 in North Carolina. We have no other knowledge of Lieutenant Colonel John Moore’s life or career.

Morison, Second Captain Duncan

Second Captain Duncan Morison served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Second Captain Duncan Morison’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no additional details about Second Captain Duncan Morison.

Morre, Private Benjamin

Private Benjamin Morre served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Benjamin Morre’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no further information about Private Benjamin Morre.

Morrison, Private John

Private John Morrison served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private John Morrison’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no additional details about Private John Morrison.

Moses, Private Joshua

Private Joshua Moses served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private Joshua Moses’ unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no further information about Private Joshua Moses.

Murphy, Private John

Private John Murphy served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private John Murphy’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no additional details about Private John Murphy’s life, death or military career.

Nocholson, Timothey

Timothey Nocholson was a member of the Loyalist Community, living in North Carolina. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as the other states, began confiscating most of the Loyalist’s Lands. The states, then sold the lands, mostly to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause. We believe Timothey Nocholson, to be Timothy Nicholson.

On October the 24th, of 1786, Timothey Nocholson or Timothy Nicholson lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Edgecombe County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of land, to Abner Robertson, for the sum of 70 pounds, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786, Timothey Nocholson lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in Edgecombe County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of acres of land, to Richard Blackledge or Blakledge for the sum of 76 pounds, in British money.

Norton, Private John

Private John Norton was a Refugee of the Second Class. He was from North Carolina. Private John Norton joined the North Carolina Loyalist Militia. He was stationed in Charlestown (now Charleston), South Carolina in 1782. His commanding officer was Lieutenant General Leslie. The Paymaster of Private John Norton was Paymaster Colonel Robert Gray. We have no further information about the life, death or military career of Private John Norton.

Obey, Lawrence

Lawrence Obey was a member of the community of loyalists, living in North Carolina. He was also a landowner. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as, the other states, began confiscating almost all of the Loyalist’s lands. The states, then sold the lands, to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On October 24th, of 1786, Lawrence Obey lost 355 acres of land, to confiscation, in Edgecombe County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 355 acres, to John Deloach, for the sum of 309 pounds, in British money.

Owens, Private William

Private William Owens served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private William Owens’ unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no other knowledge about Private William Owens’ life, death or military career.

Owings, Private Bazel

Private Bazel Owings joined the Regiment of a North Carolina Loyalist Militia. He became a part of the regiment on the 22nd of June in 1780. Private Bazel Owings’ commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Bryan. He was stationed in Charlestown (now Charleston), South Carolina. He saw action and died on January the 15th in 1781. Private Bazel Owings is sometimes listed as Private Bazel Owens. He was the father of Private William Owings. We have no additional details of the life, death or military career of Private Bazel Owings.

Owings, Private William

Private William Owings joined the Regiment of a North Carolina Loyalist unit. He became a part of the regiment on the 22nd of June in 1780. Private William Owings’ commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Bryan. He was stationed in Charlestown (now Charleston), South Carolina. Private William Owings was a part of the unit in caharge of the Refugees of North Carolina and South Carolina. He saw action and was wounded on the 6th of August in 1780 at the Battle of Hanging Rock, in South Carolina. Private William Owings is sometimes listed as Private William Owens. He was the son of Private Bazel Owings. He was paid on August 9th of 1782 for his and his dead father’s service by Paymaster Colonel Robert Gray. We have no other knowledge of the life or military career of Private William Owings.

Palmer, Robert

Robert Palmer was a member of the Loyalists of North Carolina. As almost all Loyalists had their land confiscated; Robert Palmer had his land confiscated by the government of North Carolina. In the few years after the American Revolution the confiscation of the Loyalist land was on going.

On January the 9th, of 1784, Robert Palmer lost 640 acres of land, to confiscation, in Wayne County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 640 acres, to Samuel Chapman, for the sum of 380 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Robert Palmer lost 200 acres of land, to confiscation, in Anson County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 200 acres, to Spruce McCoy, for the sum of 80 pounds, in British money.

On June the 5th, of 1784, Robert Palmer lost 300 acres of land, to confiscation, in Anson County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 300 acres, to Spruce McCoy, for the sum of 100 pounds, in British money.

On April the 25th, of 1785, Robert Palmour (We believe this entry to be Robert Palmer) lost 272 acres of land, to confiscation, in Randolph County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 272 acres, to John Standfield, for the sum of 356 pounds, in British money.

On October the 8th, of 1786, Robert Palmer lost 241 acres of land, to confiscation, in Beaufort County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 241 acres, to William McCabe, for the sum of 76 pounds, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786, Robert Palmer lost 128 acres of land, to confiscation, in Beaufort County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 128 acres, to Joseph Leech, for the sum of 65 pounds, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786, Robert Palmer lost 640 acres of land, to confiscation, in Hyde County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 640 acres, to Joseph Leech, for the sum of 370 pounds, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786, Robert Palmer lost an unknown amount of acres of land, in Hyde County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of acres, to Joseph Leech, for the sum of 91 pounds, in British money.

On October the 24th, of 1786, Robert Palmer lost over 60 acres of land, to confiscation, in Hyde County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same over 60 acres, to Joseph Leech, for the sum of 76 pounds, in British money.

On November the 5th, of 1787, Robert Palmer lost 640 acres of land, to confiscation, in Hyde County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 640 acres, to James Alderston, for the sum of 340 pounds, in British money.

On November the 5th, of 1787, Robert Palmer lost 200 acres of land, to confiscation, in Hyde County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 200 acres, to James Jasper, for the sum of 302 pounds, in British money.

On November the 5th, of 1787, Robert Palmer lost 300 acres of land, to confiscation, in Hyde County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 300 acres, to John Cooper, for the sum of 59 pounds, in British money.

On November the 5th, of 1787, Robert Palmer lost 500 acres of land, to confiscation, in Hyde County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 500 acres, to John Cooper, for the sum of 250 pounds, in British money.

On November the 5th, of 1787, Robert Palmer lost 260 acres of land, to confiscation, in Hyde County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 260 acres, to John Cooper, for the sum of 205 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, Robert Palmour (We believe this entry to be Robert Palmer) lost 65 acres of land, to confiscation, in Craven County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 65 acres, to John Gray Blount, for the sum of 15 pounds, in British money.

Palmer, William

William Palmer was a member of the Loyalist community, in North Carolina. He was also, a Landowner. At the end of the American Revolution, North Carolina, as well as the other states, began confiscating most of the Loyalist’s lands. The states, then sold almost all of the lands, to the Patriots, or those who, fought or gave aid for the American cause.

On November the 5th, of 1787, William Palmer lost 400 acres of land, to confiscation, in Hyde County, North Carolina. The state of North Carolina, then sold the same 400 acres, to John Cooper, for the sum of 401 pounds, in British money.

Palmour, William

William Palmour was a member of the Loyalist in North Carolina. He was, also a landowner. At the end of the American Revolution, the individual states started confiscating the Loyalist land. The states, then sold the land to the Patriots, or people, who fought or gave aid for the American cause. We believe William Palmour and William Palmer could be the same person.

On November the 15th, of 1787, William Palmour lost 320 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 320 acres, to Jarrett Ervin, for the sum of 120 pounds and 3 shillings, in British money.

Parker, George

George Parker was a Loyalist living in North Carolina. At the close of the American Revolution, the state (former colonies) started selling almost all the Loyalists land. Each of the states, then sold the land to the Patriots, or people, who fought for or gave aid to the cause.

On November the 15th, of 1787, George Parker, lost 300 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 300 acres, to John Russ, Jr., for the sum of 54 pounds, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, George Parker, lost 195 acres of land, to confiscation, in Bladen County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same 195 acres, to William Bryant, for the sum of 753 pounds and 1 shilling, in British money.

On November the 15th, of 1787, George Parker, lost an unknown amount of acres of land, to confiscation, in New Hanover County, North Carolina. The State of North Carolina, then sold the same unknown amount of land, to John Kingsborough, for the sum of 3,00 pounds, in British money.

Parker, Captain Mathew

Captain Mathew Parker was from Bladden County, North Carolina. He began his military career on May 1, 1781. The commanding officer of his unit was Colonel Hector Mac Neill of the North Carolina Loyalist Milita. He began his service under Colonel Hector Mac Neill on September 17, 1781. We have no additional details about Captain Mathew Parker.

Piper, Mate John

Mate John Piper was born in Scotland. He volunteered in North Carolina at the age of 23. Mate John Piper began his military career between 1777 and 1783. We have no further information about Mate John Piper.

Pemberton, Private James

Private James Pemberton served in His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina Loyalist Militia. The commanding officer was Colonel Samuel Campbell. Private James Pemberton’s unit was stationed on James’s Island at the beginning of the war and ending on the fifth day of May in 1782. He was a refugee of North or South Carolina. We have no additional details about Private James Pemberton.

Plowman, Sergeant John

Sergeant John Plowman was a member of His Majesty’s Regiment of North Carolina. He served under the command of Colonel Samuel Campbell. Sergeant John Plowman and his unit were stationed at James Island. This regiment began their service on May 5, of 1782. During this period, Sergeant John Plowman and his man were responsible for the refugees from North Carolina and South Carolina, 1781 through 1782. We have no further information of the life or career of Sergeant John Plowman.

 

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.